Community

Thu
21
Feb

Free seeds at FRESH Project’s last winter market

It’s not too early to start planning your summer garden, and the FRESH Project is helping by giving out free vegetable seed packets.

To advance its mission of making healthy food accessible to all, the FRESH Project will hand out free seeds at its last winter market, which will be held March 2 from 8 a.m. to noon at the First Presbyterian Church, 100 Presbyterian St., Shawano.

“We’re all about fresh produce to ensure good, healthy food for everyone,” said Barb Mendoza, executive director. “In addition to the seed distribution, this will be the last opportunity to visit the winter market for the season. It’s a great time to come to the winter market and buy local. We will have meat and vegetable producers along with bakery and craft vendors. There will also be live music.” The FRESH Project’s new cookbook, filled with healthy recipes supplied by community members, will be available for $10.

Wed
20
Feb

Top risks for heart disease identified

February is National Heart Month, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that half of all Americans have at least one of the top-three risk factors for heart disease — high blood pressure, high cholesterol or cigarette use.

Prevea Health and HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital encourage people to be aware of the risk factors and take steps now to improve their heart health.

• High blood pressure occurs when the pressure of the blood in your arteries and blood vessels is too high. If not controlled, this can affect your heart, kidneys and brain. Often called a silent killer, many people do not notice symptoms that signal high blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure by changes in lifestyle or medication can reduce the risk of heart disease and heart attack.

Sat
16
Feb

Slipping, sliding through winter no fun anymore

With four named snowstorms and only halfway through February, I’ve had enough of winter. I know there are some of you that gleefully play in the snow, and yippee for you. Give me green grass, the aroma of a freshly-cut field of alfalfa, or slipping on flip flops to run to the garden to gather fresh veges for our supper; that’s more my style.

Sat
16
Feb

More choices on television, but still not much to watch

A television is a funny thing, and one that did not arrive in my life until I was in seventh grade. Those were the days of wall to wall westerns, such as “Have Gun Will Travel,” “Maverick,” and of course “Gunsmoke.” Those were also the days of “I Love Lucy” and “The Ed Sullivan Show,” which were watched on a regular basis in my childhood home.

Most of these shows can still be seen as reruns on several cable networks, as can old game shows. It seems strange, that now, instead of watching the new programing, I watch a lot of the older shows.

In my teen years, I rocked out with “American Bandstand,” hosted by Dick Clark, and the “Mickey Mouse Club,” with that catchy theme song. All I need to do is think back, and I can sing it out. There were crime shows, such as “Dragnet,” and “77 Sunset Strip.” “Leave it to Beaver” was probably my favorite sitcom, but, in those days, comedy was actually laugh out loud funny, without the innuendo.

Sat
16
Feb

SING, ALL YE FAITHFUL


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Wolf River Homeschoolers, from left, Marie Kluge, Misty Luckow, Annika Jannusch and Charli Ritter rehearse a dance number for “Pilgrim” Thursday afternoon at Clintonville High School. Kluge helped to choreograph the performers for this song.

The Wolf River Homeschoolers Performing Arts program has always been Christian-based, but until now, the musicals they have performed did not directly address God.

The homeschoolers will be performing “Pilgrim,” a musical based off of “Pilgrim’s Progress” set in a contemporary time period that looks at what happens to a young man trying to stay on the Lord’s path and being tempted by worldly excesses.

“This is the first time that we’ve done (something) explicitly Christian,” said Charlene Stuewer, the show’s director. “It was a good time for us to go back to what we are about, our foundation. It’s been hard to find shows that can accommodate our needs.”

The musical adapts John Bunyan’s classic tale and follows a young man named Christian as he attempts to reach the Celestial City. For two hours, the show runs the gamut of biblical themes from faith to repentance, friendship to hardship, and temptation to death and eternity.

Sat
16
Feb

Trees went down so homesteads could go up in Shawano

Shawano was once covered with dense forests. In researching Shawano’s history, I learned land was cheap and plentiful in the mid-1800s. Anyone who was physically able could clear land for a homestead. However, that was no easy job. Early settlers cut the trees and piled them up. When they had a large pile, they lit it on fire to clear the area. Imagine the beautiful hardwood, cedar and pine that had to be burned to give the early settlers a place to build, plant a garden and start farming.

Sat
16
Feb

Fish Derby is longtime Marion Lions tradition

The Marion Lions Club will hold its 57th annual Fish Derby on Feb. 23. The much-anticipated fundraiser has a long history on the Marion pond.

John Bartelt, who was a charter member of the Marion Lions, recalls a time when the members were trying to decide on a fundraiser. Initially, they settled on snowmobile races on the pond, but those didn’t go over very well, Bartelt said. “We were too ignorant about how to run the races,” he said.

Club members then decided to use the pond for a fishing derby. It started out small, but the fundraiser has grown considerably over the years.

In the early days, the Lions gave away a car as the grand prize in the raffle. “When the cars became too expensive, we changed to $5,000 cash for the first prize, and then ticket sales really took off,” said Karen Fisher, secretary of the Marion Lions. Her husband, Eugene, is also an active member and big ticket-seller.

Sat
16
Feb

There’s a variety of ways to treat your child’s cold

The common cold is medically known as an upper respiratory tract infection. Despite the chesty cough that often sends us to the doctor, the lungs are not affected.

There are over 200 viruses that cause the common cold. Unfortunately, antibiotics have no effect on the common cold; you must fight the virus on your own.

While children average six to eight colds a year (double if in preschool or daycare), adults do not get as many colds. They’ve already been exposed to many viruses and have developed immunity.

December through April is cold and flu season, where viral illnesses are most common. A drippy nose usually lasts 7-10 days and a cough, 10-14 days. One child out of three will cough for up to three weeks, but the cough will actually sound worse as it gets better.

Colds do not usually wipe your child out; the cold symptoms often bother the parents more. Otherwise, kids act pretty normal except for the constant runny nose and cough.

Fri
15
Feb

TEENAGE FANTASIES


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski J.W. Barlament, a 17-year-old high school junior from Oneida, sets up his books Saturday morning at Beans and Books in Shawano. Barlament has written two fantasy novels and self-published them through Amazon.

J.W. Barlament had an interesting trip to Shawano on Saturday morning.

On his way to a book signing and presentation of his two novels at Beans and Books in Shawano, he found himself in an unpleasant situation. Like many others driving Wisconsin roads in winter, Barlament’s car wound up in the ditch, and it appeared he would not make it to the presentation.

“There was this one fairly sharp turn, so I was just thinking, ‘OK, just slow down, and you’ll be fine,’” Barlament said. “I was going 15, maybe 20 (mph). Still went right into the ditch.”

Barlament had a shovel in his trunk to help dig himself out, but it broke as he tried to escape. Fortunately, the ditch in question was not far from his home, so he was able to secure alternate transportation to make it to Shawano, albeit an hour behind schedule, to meet potential new fans and sell some books.

Fri
15
Feb

Grant to fund healthy food, exercise program for Menominee

To help address some chronic health problems within the Menominee Nation, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Division of Extension has been awarded a $2.5 million grant. The money, which comes from the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will fund a project called “Kemāmaceqtaq: We’re all moving.”

“We are grateful to be a partner with Extension in addressing this chronic health issue,” said Brian Kowalkowski, dean for the Department of Continuing Education at the College of Menominee Nation. “Extension has decades of experience with evidence-based community revitalization and health promotion programs. History shows Extension’s commitment to sustained partnerships in communities and authentic relationships with local leaders.”

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