Community

Fri
20
May

Optimists add 7 new members


Contributed Photo The seven newest members of the Shawano Optimist Club are, from left, seated, Kriss Kimmer, Michael Johnston and Jennifer Schroeder; standing, Brad Rabideau, Michael Musolff, Dan Mauel and James Lonick.

The Shawano Optimist Club, which has served youth and many organizations in the Shawano area for 40 years, added seven new members following a recent membership drive.

Longtime Optimist member Jim Leuenberger conducted the installation of the new members at a recent club meeting.

“Being a member of the Shawano Optimist Club will provide great opportunities for you to return service to your community,” he told the new members. “We invite you to share your talents and resources by serving on club committees and working on service and fund-raising projects.”

Here is a brief profile of each of the new members:

• Daniel Mauel is a lieutenant and 26-year member of the Shawano Police Department.

• Kriss Kimmer has lived in the Shawano community for the past 10 years.

Fri
20
May

Optimists’ bike rodeo draws 82 kids


Contributed Photo Winners of the 2016 Shawano Optimist Club bike rodeo are, from left, front row, Brooklyn Wright, Aden Steinbring, Elizabeth Behnke, Rachael Carroll, Teagan Harkey, Madisyn Skalitsky, Bennett Aumann, Ashton Brugger, Makenna Bubolz, Grace Bubolz and Lily Bubolz; back row, Donavan Steinbring, Hunter Colon, Rose Cavanaugh, Sarah Carroll, Crew Weisnicht, Chase Christenson, Alex Paque, Derek Minch and Alexia Powell.

Kadyn Graf was the grand prize winner with a perfect score Saturday at the Shawano Optimist Bike Rodeo at Zion Lutheran Church in Shawano.

Gail Moesch, club first vice president, said 82 boys and girls, from kindergarten through sixth grade, participated in the event.

Each child received a free bike helmet and was eligible to sign up for drawings for two free bikes and several other prizes, said Gary Cumberland, second vice president.

The city waived the fee for bike licenses for the event, and about 50 people obtained licenses, according to Police Chief Mark Kohl, who is also a club member.

The event included bike maintenance checks before the kids got to show off their bike skills including balancing at a slow speed, coasting, straight-line riding, figure-8 riding, weaving and stopping on a line.

In addition to the grand prize, trophies were awarded to the top three boys and girls in each age group.

The winners were:

Fri
20
May

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Mike Eidahl is the president of the Shawano County Historical Society. He is standing by a quilt that was made around 1911 and given to the society by the Wallrich family. It will be on display during the Rhubarb Festival.

Mike Eidahl is the president of the Shawano County Historical Society. He was born in Rice Lake and graduated from Spooner High School.

Eidahl attended Barron County Teachers College, getting a two-year degree. By the time he graduated, the laws changed and teachers needed to get a four-year degree. Eidahl earned a degree in elementary education with a minor in history from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. In 1970, he got his first and last job teaching fourth grade at Olga Brener Elementary School. He retired in 2006.

Eidahl and his wife, Dorothy, also a retired teacher, have been married 44 years. They have two children and four grandchildren. They live in Shawano and enjoy traveling.

Mike is a member of curling teams in Clintonville, and he likes to golf and do yard work. Mike also volunteers for Junior Achievement, and both Mike and Dorothy volunteer at Zion Lutheran Church in Shawano.

Q How did you get started with the historical society?

Fri
20
May

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Members of Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church in Zachow are planning a special memorial for veterans Wednesday at the Zion Cemetery. Shown are, from left, Rhonda Buhrke, the Rev. Richard Buhrke, Terry Radtke and Robert Krause, kneeling by the grave of his father, Robert Krause Sr.

Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, Zachow, will hold a memorial celebration Wednesday in Zion Cemetery to honor the veterans who are buried there along with the veterans who are members of the church.

“We want to honor our veterans and this is just another opportunity,” said Bob Krause, chairman of the congregation.

Krause’s father, Robert T. Krause, an Army veteran of World War II and Korea, is buried in the cemetery.

Markers have been placed by the graves of 12 veterans: Paul Dobratz, Elder Koeller, Robert J. Krause, Ervin Kroening, Robert Kroening, James Mills, John F. Oshefsky, John Radtke, John (F) Radtke, Wilheim Radtke, Otto Rueckert and August Schachtsneider.

Richard Barkhaus, financial officer of Zernicke-Wegner American Legion Post 217, along with other post members will place flags in the markers before the ceremony and remove them the following week to preserve them for next year.

Fri
20
May

One rainy day in May — Part II

That rainy day in May when we sold our cows produced a roller coaster of emotions. The first few days, I felt like a fish out of water. My entire purpose was farming, the cows had structured our days. By the third day, I was still floundering, but understood as the days passed, we would develop a new routine.

Our planning started a couple of years ago when we first put into motion what we had been tossing around for some time. We talked and prayed and prayed and talked and finally, we decided three things must be concrete before we would sell: One of us needs to get a job with insurance, we will have to have thirty Black Angus heifers and steers, and, most obviously, we needed a buyer.

Fri
20
May

Readers have followed columnist’s life for 31 years

On May 28, 1985, my first column appeared in The Shawano Evening Leader; yes, that was the newspaper’s name at that time. It seems a lifetime ago, and certainly a lot of life has passed by during those 31 years.

My first thought is that how has my life been interesting enough for people to actually want to read my column. I consider it to be a somewhat humdrum, normal life, not so different than many others live.

That reminds me of the several years that I attended a writing class through the tech school in Shawano. For years, every Friday morning I would travel to Shawano, to the library, where the class was taught. I met so many inspiring writers in that class, and loved the teacher, who always encouraged me.

Fri
20
May

Gardening with the help of Three Sisters


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski More than a dozen people participated in a workshop Thursday to learn about Three Sisters gardens. Corn, bean and squash were planted together for mutual growth and protection.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski David “Jonesy” Miller holds up ears of corn as he explains the symbiotic relationship of corn, beans and squash in the Three Sisters gardening system during a workshop Thursday at the College of Menominee Nation.

David “Jonesy” Miller is eager to see his people, the Menominee, get back to their roots, and he’s starting with a garden.

Miller worked with more than a dozen people at a workshop about Three Sisters gardening Thursday at the College of Menominee Nation.

The three sisters are squash, corn and beans, which according to legend are inseparable sisters who only grow and thrive together.

Squash leaves provide necessary shade and help to prevent weeds from flourishing, Miller said, while the corn provides a natural pole for bean plants to wrap around, and the beans absorb nitrogen to benefit the other plants.

All three were planted together on high mounds flattened on top. Workshop participants made sure the mounds were several feet apart from each other to allow sufficient space for growth.

Fri
20
May

Delta Kappa Gamma honors Krueger, elects officers


Contributed Photo Joan Wohler, right, presents the Shawano area Nu Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma Service Award to Shirley Krueger at the group’s May meeting.

Contributed Photo Nu Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma installed new officers in May. Shown are, from left, Sue Hlinak, president; Jan Mielke, vice president; guest speaker Marilyn Lambert, Sigma State president; Dianne Kjendalen, secretary; and Mary Lou Donnelly, treasurer.

Shirley Krueger received the Shawano area Nu Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma Service Award at the chapter’s May meeting.

Joan Wohler presented the award at Mathew’s Supper Club in Clintonville.

Krueger earned her Bachelor of Science degree in education from Oshkosh State University. She taught in the Pulaski graded school, Title 1 in Shawano and Gresham, and second grade at St. James Lutheran School.

After her retirement in 1995, Krueger was secretary and coordinator of service for her husband’s baling operation. She is also active in the Shawano County Area Retired Teachers’ Association, a docent at the historical park and a church volunteer.

She has served on many Nu Chapter committees, including research, and has led group book discussions.

Fri
20
May

Delta Kappa Gamma honors Krueger, elects officers


Contributed Photo Joan Wohler, right, presents the Shawano area Nu Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma Service Award to Shirley Krueger at the group’s May meeting.

Contributed Photo Nu Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma installed new officers in May. Shown are, from left, Sue Hlinak, president; Jan Mielke, vice president; guest speaker Marilyn Lambert, Sigma State president; Dianne Kjendalen, secretary; and Mary Lou Donnelly, treasurer.

Shirley Krueger received the Shawano area Nu Chapter Delta Kappa Gamma Service Award at the chapter’s May meeting.

Joan Wohler presented the award at Mathew’s Supper Club in Clintonville.

Krueger earned her Bachelor of Science degree in education from Oshkosh State University. She taught in the Pulaski graded school, Title 1 in Shawano and Gresham, and second grade at St. James Lutheran School.

After her retirement in 1995, Krueger was secretary and coordinator of service for her husband’s baling operation. She is also active in the Shawano County Area Retired Teachers’ Association, a docent at the historical park and a church volunteer.

She has served on many Nu Chapter committees, including research, and has led group book discussions.

Fri
20
May

City garden plots available

The city of Shawano is looking for a few green thumbs.

There are still gardening plots available for Shawano residents who like to garden but have no place to indulge their hobby, according to city administrative assistant Lisa Bruette.

Those all dressed up in their gardening clothes with no place to grow have several-sized plot options at the city’s garden, located on West Lieg Avenue by the Wolf River.

Six of the city’s 32 ground-level gardening plots, measuring 30 by 36 feet, are still available.

There are also 4-by-8-foot table gardens available for the disabled, as well as box gardens of the same size.

Bruette said three of the six table garden spots, and five of the six box gardens, were still open as of Thursday.

Garden plots are $10. Table and box gardens are free.

The gardens are available only to city residents, and gardeners must sign a contract agreeing to follow the city’s gardening rules.

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