Community

Fri
19
Jan

Women’s march in Shawano Saturday

The Shawano Women’s March “Marching Together” is being organized and all are invited, whether they’re a woman or not.

The march begins and ends at Franklin Park in Shawano. It takes place at 11 a.m. Saturday, but it’s recommended to arrive about 10:45 a.m. Issues being embraced are unity and equality, registering and voting, embracing diversity, environmental justice, supporting the Dreamers and healthcare access for all.

The walk will take place down Division State to Main Street, north on Main Street to the Shawano County Courthouse, where there will be songs and a short talk by Georgia Stapleton, who attended the Women’s March in Washington D.C. last year. The walk will conclude back at Franklin Park.

The weather forecast is for partly sunny skies and a high of 42 degrees.

Sat
13
Jan

Memory Café in Keshena helps people and their caregivers


Photo by Carol Wagner Joyce Wayka, tribal dementia care specialist, has started a Memory Café in Keshena.

A Memory Café is available at the Keshena Senior Center every third Tuesday of the month. The Memory Café is for people with early stage memory loss, their caregivers and family. They can spend time with others who are experiencing the same journey.

Tribal dementia care specialist, Joyce Wayka, provides the activities.

“Anyone can come,” she said. “I would like people, their caregivers, and relatives to be involved.”

Wayka provides coffee, juice and snacks for the activities which are from 1:30-3 p.m.

“I attended cafés in Green Bay and Shawano to get an idea of what they do,” she said.

Her activities go along with the holidays. In November, they made centerpieces, and in December, they made wreaths. She likes to do things that the participants can take home.

“I’m very creative,” said Wayka, who has two associate degrees and is working on her bachelors degree.

Sat
13
Jan

Meet Al and Gloria Pyatskowit


Photo by Carol Wagner Al and Gloria Pyatskowit volunteer at the Navarino Nature Center, where she counts birds and he helps with events. They are at their home in the town of Richmond, where the bird feeders attract many birds.

Al and Gloria Pyatskowit volunteer at the Navarino Nature Center.

Al was born in Keshena, graduating from Suring High School. He attended University of Wisconsin-La Crosse for a year and then finished his education at UW-Green Bay in 1972 with a degree in regional analysis with an emphasis on education. Al worked for Menominee County for two years in the Youth Core Program and then for two years on the Menominee Education Committee to establish the Menominee Indian School District. He spent two years as community education coordinator followed by teaching biology at Menominee Indian High School for 30 years. Al was at the College of Menominee Nation, where he worked with the nursing program for five years. He currently works part time with his sons in their logging business.

Sat
13
Jan

Wisconsin students work on book about Ho-Chunk culture


Photo by John Hart/Wisconsin State Journal Fifth-grade students at Lincoln Elementary School in Madison including, from left, Simon Yuroff, Gus Tills and Lucero Dunscombe, use a mobile phone to view a digital rendering of a children’s book about the Ho-Chunk Nation which they helped write and illustrate as third-graders at the school. A tribal grant supported a print run of 2,000 copies.

In a cross-cultural literary feat two years in the making, a class of dual-language immersion students at Lincoln Elementary School in Madison has helped create the first trilingual children’s book about the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Now in fifth grade, the students as third-graders in teacher Emily Schroeder’s class worked for several months with a Ho-Chunk tribal officer and Ho-Chunk students from a language school in Nekoosa to record, transcribe and illustrate a traditional Ho-Chunk story about a boy on a quest, and translate it into English, Spanish and Ho-Chunk.

“I wanted to dive deeper into this whole idea of Madison history before European contact,” Schroeder told the Wisconsin State Journal. “Plus there are not a lot of children’s books, fictional or nonfictional, in general about the Ho-Chunk Nation.”

Fri
12
Jan

Shawano County puts up 334th barn quilt


Photo by Jim Leuenberger Shown with Shawano County’s 334th barn quilt are, from left, Mark Heck, PACE (Pulaski Area Community Education) and summer school director; Cyril and Jackie Krajewski, brother and sister-in-law of the last owner of the farm, Ted Krajewski; Jim Zajac, Ted’s nephew who worked on the farm while attending school in Pulaski; Bryan Sesko, Ted’s grandson; and Deb Schneider, PACE and sponsor of the quilt.

Deb Schneider has sponsored Shawano County’s 334th barn quilt that is now on display on a shed where a dairy farm used to be. It is at the corner of South St. Augustine and Crest Streets, on property where Pulaski High School now stands.

The idea for a barn quilt on the school’s property was part of last year’s summer school program. Schneider taught a class called “Mini Barn Quilts,” in which students studied the history of barn quilts, toured the Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce to see where the Shawano County barn quilts are painted, and heard a presentation from Jim Leuenberger about the history of the Shawano County barn quilt project, which he started in 2010.

Sat
06
Jan

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Helen Warren leads the senior citizens exercise class at the Shawano Civic Center. Those who attended a recent class are, front row, from left, Gail Moesch, Mary Vanderpoel, Betty Szucs, Jean Brockman, Warren, Nancy Theis, Karen Grover, and Irma Arendt; back row, Carol Soufal, Karen Boardman, Barb Bubolz, Diane Owen, Beverly Schultz, Karen Pieper, Connie Slewinski, Donna Wilson, Carol Schoenhofen and Vicki Hanauer.

It’s the time of year when some people think about ways to improve their lives.

The senior citizens exercise class at the Shawano Civic Center is a way for people to improve their flexibility and balance. There is another benefit, too.

“We do a lot of laughing,” said class leader Helen Warren. “Mostly they laugh at me.”

She said there are ladies in their 80s and 90s who come to the class, which is open to anyone. Some of the ladies with canes stand next to a chair or sit in the chair while exercising.

“It’s fun to watch,” Warren said.

Someone new who is just starting out doesn’t need to do the aerobic part, and you can come to a class and see if you like it before you join. Men are always welcome to participate.

Sat
06
Jan

Loading up the animals

We were raising a bull to breed our Black Angus heifers and, some time ago, had to load him up to take him to market because he was becoming increasingly mean and nasty. So, of course, that necessitated his trip to the market.

The day came for us to get him into the trailer. I was extremely nervous about this because, let’s face it: A bull is a bull. I have total faith in my husband, for he is proficient in handling animals on the farm; he gets them to go where they need to go. But working with a bull got me on the defensive, and I was driving him nuts with my anxiousness. I had never in my life been around a bull. Actually, neither of our families ever had a bull on the place.

Sat
06
Jan

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Joanne Bublitz, holding CC Cookie II, volunteers for many organizations.

Joanne Bublitz volunteers for many organizations.

She was born and raised in River Forest, a suburb of Chicago. After Bublitz graduated from Luther High School North, she earned a teaching degree with a minor in music from Concordia College in River Forest. After marrying and eventually moving to Shawano in 1969, Bublitz raised her children and then taught third grade at St. James Lutheran School for 19 years. During this time she also gave piano lessons and still has one student.

Joanne and her husband, Don, have been married 59 years and have three sons and six grandchildren. They used to volunteer for Marriage Encounter. They live in Shawano on the channel with their toy poodle, Cookie. Bublitz crochets hot pads for her niece’s painting business and loves making afghans.

Q What do you do at St. Jakobi Lutheran Church?

Sat
06
Jan

It’s Wisconsin, so it’s going to be cold

Wherever I go these days, people are saying, “It’s cold.” First of all, I already knew that. I was out in it, also, but perhaps I had gloves on — my coat zipped. And if I am going to be outside for any length of time or if it is windy, I also have a warm hat on my head.

How do I know that it is cold? Well, the weather forecasters have been claiming doom and gloom for the past couple of weeks. Even when the temperature is to get up into the teens or even 20s, they say the wind chill will still be serious, and it won’t feel warmer.

Sat
06
Jan

‘Lombardi’ back for another round at Mielke

Happy New Year!

“Lombardi” is back in town. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the last game Vince Lombardi coached for the Green Bay Packers. A special encore presentation of “Lombardi,” written by Eric Simonson, comes to the Mielke Arts Center on Jan. 26-28.

Ralph Beversdorf returns playing Lombardi, and Geoff Madsen again plays the reporter, Michael McCormick. Jodi Angeli plays Marie Lombardi, and the cast is rounded out with Lloyd Frieson as Dave Robinson, Dave Stuewer as Paul Hornung and Dave Woosencraft as Jim Taylor. Tom Madsen is directing, assisted by Early Fuller.

The Friday and Saturday shows will be dinner theater with seating commencing at 5 p.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. The play starts at 7 p.m. General seating will also be available. Sunday is a 2 p.m. matinee with general seating only.

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