Community

Sat
16
Jun

Task force working to get drugs safely off streets


Photo by Carol Wagner Jennifer Frost and Sheriff Adam Bieber stand by new prescription drug collection box at the Shawano County Sheriff’s Department.

Getting unused prescription drugs safely out of circulation is the goal of the Drug Take Back Task Force. They meet four times a year to discuss ways and means to do it. Shawano County began the project in earnest beginning in January this year with a Drug Take Back Day the last Saturday in April.

“We retrieved 285 pounds of medications,” said Shawano County Sheriff Adam Bieber, a member of the task force.

The main things for people to know is what they can drop and what they can’t. You can bring prescription and over-the-counter medications, ointments, patches, non-aerosol sprays, inhalers, creams, vials and pet medications. These items should be taken out of their containers and put in clear plastic bags.

Resident should not bring illegal drugs, needles, aerosol cans, and biohazardous materials, which is anything containing bodily fluid or blood.

Sat
16
Jun

Meet Wiladean ‘Willie’ Peters


Photo by Carol Wagner Wiladean “Willie” Peters volunteers at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena and is shown in the Book Share room.

Wiladean “Willie” Peters volunteers at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena.

After graduating from Gresham High School, Peters attended Milwaukee Technical College. Then she went to Northeast Wisconsin Technical College in Green Bay where she became a licensed practical nurse.

Peters worked at Bellin, Brown County Mental Health, and a CBRF for 22 years. She returned to Northeast Wisconsin Technical College to get an associate degree to be a registered nurse, working at a nursing home and a clinic for 17 years before retiring.

Peters and her husband, Wilmer, have been married 49 years and have two children and five grandchildren. They live on Legend Lake.

Where do you volunteer?

“I volunteer at the St. Michael Catholic Church Food Pantry, the pastoral council, and wherever needed. I am head of the stewardship committee and secretary to the pastoral council. I work with the social concerns committee.”

Sat
16
Jun

Connecting with kids through reading program


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Rep. Mary Felzkowski reads to Birnamwood kindergartners to promote the Reach Out and Read Wisconsin program May 25, at the Aspirus Birnamwood Clinic. The program gives a free book to any child who comes for a wellness checkup from 6 months to 5 years old.

State Rep. Mary Felzkowski, R-Irma, visited the Aspirus Birnamwood Clinic on May 25 to highlight the Reach Out and Read program. She read four books to the Birnamwood Elementary School kindergarten class.

“Parents want to do the best for their kids but don’t always know how to get that,” Felzkowski said. “If parents realize what an opportunity this program is, it can make a real impact.”

Read Out and Read is a nonprofit organization that incorporates books into pediatric care and encourages families to read aloud together. According to its website, the program serves 4.7 million children and their families each year.

Aspirus Birnamwood Clinic is one of 13 Aspirus clinics and 211 statewide that participate in Reach Out and Read, which is endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians.

Fri
15
Jun

Father’s influence still remains

Father’s Day is here again, and although my father passed away in 1974, that got me to thinking about growing up with him as my father and all of the things I learned from him

One thing that I am thankful for is he taught me how to play sheepshead. Since I grew up in the days before television, playing cards is one thing we often did when the evening chores were finished. My parents, two older brothers and I would sit and play for awhile. Since there were five of us, we usually played jack of diamonds. Being the youngest, I certainly had a learning curve.

I have been playing it on and off for most of my life. There are many different versions, depending on how many are playing. Several years ago, I found a game site online, and played a game called ace for the first time. I realized that my pa would have grown up playing that, since he grew up in Milwaukee. Most people in this area don’t play that, but I enjoy that version the best.

Fri
15
Jun

Century-old school will stay standing


Photo by Grace Kirchner The State Historical Society Preservation Committee voted to recommend the 1918 Clintonville High School building — now Rexford-Longfellow Elementary School — and attached buildings for listing on the Register of Historic Buildings on May 18. Mary Beth Kuester received the official certificate. Kuester and her sister, Kay Doran, nominated the school for the honor.

The historic 1918 school on Eighth Street in Clintonville has been added to the State Register of Historic Places by the Wisconsin State Historical Society.

Rexford-Longfellow Elementary School escaped the wrecking ball when voters in the Clintonville School District voted no to razing the facility and building a new elementary school building proposed at $24.9 million. The building was to be razed next summer. Any plans now to do any renovations to the facility will have to be submitted to the state for approval because it is now a historical landmark.

The only other building in Clintonville with the historic status is the post office on North Main Street.

Fri
15
Jun

Shawano DAV chapter merges with Manawa

Due to declining enrollment, Shawano’s Disabled American Veterans chapter 22 has merged with the Manawa DAV chapter 53, effective May 5.

For years, the Shawano chapter has been challenged to find officers and maintain member attendance, causing the chapter to risk losing its charter. The Manawa chapter, on the other hand, is very strong and has been recognized as the state’s best seven times in the last 16 years.

Previously, chapter 53 covered all of Waupaca County, Tigerton, Shiocton and Hortonville. The newly expanded chapter, with its 274 members, will cover Shawano and Waupaca counties, Shiocton and Hortonville.

Officers want the public to know that DAV will continue to have a strong Shawano County presence. Chapter meetings are held the fourth Thursday of the month at 7:30 p.m. in the Community Center, 600 Washington St., New London. A special meeting in Shawano will be held every three months, at a location to be announced.

Fri
15
Jun

Kozlovskys reign at Strawberry Festival


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON The royal court of the Homme Home Strawberry Festival includes, from left, front row, Princess Alayna Rasmussen and Prince Trenton Schmidt; back row, Queen Donna Kozlovsky and King Jim Kozlovsky.

The Strawberry Festival is the biggest ongoing event held for the residents of Homme Home for the Aging. For the past 51 years, residents have enjoyed getting together with their families to enjoy strawberries and ice cream on the lawn while they listen to music.

The tradition of crowning a royal court is something that makes the event extra special, and residents look forward to it year after year.

Jim and Donna Kozlovsky were this year’s king and queen of the annual festival. They have been residents of Homme Home since October 2016.

Donna was born and raised on a dairy farm in Wittenberg. She enjoys spending time outside and gardening. This spring, she and Jim have been raising seedlings for Homme’s garden.

Jim was born and raised in Wausau. He was employed at Marathon Corporation and ran a Christmas tree farm near Birnamwood. He first met Donna at the tree farm. Jim enjoys spending time outdoors and bird watching.

Fri
15
Jun

DHS warning about tick, mosquito bites

The state Department of Health Services is strongly encouraging everyone to take care to avoid tick and mosquito bites as the weather warms up.

Both ticks and mosquitoes can transmit various illnesses. Lyme disease, which is spread by ticks, and West Nile virus, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, account for most of the disease spread by ticks and mosquitoes in Wisconsin.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Wisconsin among the top 20 percent of states reporting cases of tick-borne disease in the country. Wisconsin reported 4,299 cases of Lyme disease in 2017, the highest number reported in the state to date.

Fri
15
Jun

Clintonville woman loses 100 pounds


Contributed Photo Debbie Korb, holding flowers and balloons, started her 100-pound weight loss journey in February 2017. She is shown with fellow Weight Watchers member Mary-Beth Kuester, left, her husband Randy Korb and Weight Watchers leader Mary Jo Johnson.

After losing more than 100 pounds, Debbie Korb, of Clintonville, celebrated the accomplishment Monday with fellow members of her Weight Watchers group at the Clintonville Congregational United Church of Christ. They celebrated with a special “cake” made of watermelon and decorated with turkey pepperoni — Korb’s favorite snack.

Mary-Beth Kuester presented Korb with flowers and balloons. Since a balloon with the number 100 was not available, she was given numbers 80 and 20.

Korb started her weight-loss journey in February 2017. She said she was experiencing shortness of breath; her doctor, however, could find nothing wrong with her. “It must be my weight,” she recalled telling her doctor, and she attended her first Weight Watchers meeting that night. Her goal was to lose 100 pounds by her birthday this July. As of Monday, she had lost 101 pounds.

Fri
15
Jun

The Golden Fleece


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Many hands make for light work as Applewood Lane Alpacas owner Darlene Nueske is joined by employee Diane Hartleben and friends Renee Donneley, Norrie, and Chris Rogers, of De Pere. They are doing the initial cleaning of the alpacas’ shorn fleece, picking out dirt, twigs, hay and other impurities before it is bagged and weighed.

PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Applewood Lane Alpacas farm manager Justin Nueske shows an alpaca after shearing.

The 87 alpacas and six llamas that live at Applewood Lane Alpacas just south of Wittenberg got their summer haircuts last month. But unlike at the barbershop where the hair is swept up and thrown away, the alpacas’ valuable fleece was shorn, cleaned and sent off for processing.

“It’s a fun process,” said Darlene Nueske, farm owner, who’s been raising alpacas for nine years.

Shearing day began when Top Notch Shearing arrived at the farm at 7 a.m. May 16. Peter Hofmann, owner of the business based in Fort Collins, Colorado, said the Nueske alpaca farm is one of the largest herds he handles. He started the business 10 years ago and travels the country with his crew, stopping at 250 farms in 70 days.

All totaled, they shear about 3,600 animals. Most of the farms they visit have only 10 to 15 alpacas, Hofmann said.

“As an example,” said Hofmann, “Colorado has 110 farms but only 1,000 total alpacas.”

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