Community

Fri
05
Oct

Crossroads Community Theatre rehearsing for fall play


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Cast and crew are working hard and having fun preparing for the next Crossroads Community Theatre production “Love Thy Neighbor,” which will be performed at the WOWSPACE in October. Shown are, from left, front row, Lois Anderson, Lisa Walkush, Jessica Gall, Dawn Meverden and Nancy Pehlke; back row, Dave Owens, Dale Hartleben, Dan Young, Paul Pehlke, Mike Gilbertson and Wade Fletcher. Missing from photo are Melissa Anderson and Cohen Wojnowiak.

It takes a lot of work to transform an art gallery into a theater space, but this year Walls of Wittenberg will have an added perk for the audience – new risers.

There will now be three viewing levels. In the past, two levels of risers limited the audience’s sight lines. They were also extremely heavy and had to be moved professionally to and from an off-site location. The new risers fold and can be stored at the WOWSPACE.

“We’re excited to have the new risers on-site, and we may be able to use them for other events or maybe even incorporate into our art show displays,” said Elaine Knab, WOW president.

The WOWSPACE was designed to be used as an art gallery. But twice a year, the Crossroads Community Theatre — the performing arts arm of Walls of Wittenberg — transforms the area to put on a comedy in the fall and a murder mystery dinner theater in February.

Thu
04
Oct

PREPARING FOR SPRING

October is prime time for planting and preparing spring bulbs for a spectacular showcase of bloom from April all the way into June. A few hard frosts and cooler soil temperatures make October the perfect month for planting spring-blooming bulbs in the garden and landscape.

Traditionally, fall means bulb planting as these treasured spring beauties require many weeks of cold temperatures in the soil in order to display their stunning spring colors.

Spring blooming bulbs provide a welcome burst of color after the season’s snows melt away and the drab landscape begins to waken with the new warmth of March and April. Favorites such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, allium and others are planted now to ensure a glorious spring emergence.

Thu
04
Oct

Cowles named Friend of Towns

The Wisconsin Towns Association recently honored state Sen. Robert Cowles, R-Green Bay, with a Friend of the Towns award during the monthly Shawano County Towns Association meeting in Angelica.

Cowles authored three pieces of legislation that were supported by the Wisconsin Towns Association in the 2017-18 session, including a clean water bill to help governments and residents repair or replace failing wells and septic tanks.

“I am honored to receive the Friend of the Towns award. Our local governments hold important and unique rolls in promoting economic development, protecting citizen’s health and welfare and improving the standard of living in their communities,” Cowles said in a statement. “Developing a state and local government partnership is crucial in advancing our state forward.”

Tue
02
Oct

ThedaCare names new VP for Shawano hospital

Julie Chikowski was named ThedaCare Vice President, Critical Access Hospitals–Shawano effective Sept. 4. She replaces the retiring Bill Schmidt.

Chikowski most recently served as the chief executive officer for Memorial Hospital of Lafayette County in Darlington. Prior to becoming CEO, she was the nursing home administrator for Lafayette Manor in the same community. Chikowski has also served as the practice administrator at Fox Valley Pulmonary Medicine; a physician liaison with Berlin Memorial Hospital, now ThedaCare Medical Center-Berlin; and director of social services/nursing home administrator at Juliette Manor in Berlin.

Chikowski is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh with a bachelor’s degree in social work with a psychology emphasis, has completed nursing home administrator coursework the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and holds Wisconsin nursing home administrator and social work licenses.

Tue
02
Oct

Beef producer meeting planned

While Wisconsin is known as America’s Dairyland, interest in raising beef cattle is on the rise. A recent U.S. Department of Agriculture census showed that a majority of cow/calf operations have less than 50 head of cattle, but raise nearly a third of the United States calf crop annually. With a plentiful supply out-of-use dairy farm operations and pasture land available, many who work off the farm or have retired from dairying find raising beef cattle a natural fit for their available facilities.

Tue
02
Oct

2 new staff members at Bellin clinic in Bonduel

Bellin Health Bonduel is pleased to welcome family medicine physician Iris Perez and family medicine physician assistant Brad Miller to its health care team.

Perez, who is board-certified in family medicine, offers expertise in these areas, among others: chronic disease management, like diabetes and heart disease; minor office procedures, like skin biopsies, stitches and wart removal; and joint injections. In addition to serving the Bonduel community, she will continue to see patients at Bellin’s Oconto facility.

Perez earned her medical degree at the University of the Philippines College of Medicine. She completed her residency at Family Medicine in Norfolk, Virginia. In her free time, Perez enjoys traveling and camping, as well as fishing, gardening, cross-stitch and needlepoint.

Sat
29
Sep

Raspberries burst with flavor and memories

Around 10 or 12 years ago we bought a dozen ever-bearing raspberry bushes. When our middle one was delegated to mowing the lawn one day, he mowed right over the tender little plants. I sighed. You can’t see a patch, kid? How could I holler at him? I never did warn him they were planted there.

Figuring we’d have to go out and buy some more, we procrastinated, and the next year, were pleasantly surprised to see those plants had bounced back as soon as the weather warmed. They quite literally took off, and since then we’ve had those bushes produce two batches of sweet red berries, one in late June and again now in September until a deep freeze. Maybe it helped to mow them down.

Sat
29
Sep

Every bit helps: money-making memories on the farm

As I was growing up on a farm in the 1940s and ’50s, I knew we were not rich when it came to money. However, I never knew why we did some things on our farm, and I didn’t understand that the things we did were to earn a little extra money to actually pay for the farm.

My parents married in 1929 at St. Paul, the Stony Hill church, in Shawano County. They were both 29 years old. My mother was a farm girl, raised in Shawano County, but she had gone to Milwaukee for more job opportunities.

They met on a blind date and eventually got married. The Depression hit shortly after they wed, and my mother told my dad that if they moved up north and bought a farm, they could at least grow their own food, as there were no jobs to be had in Milwaukee.

Sat
29
Sep

Shawano author’s book examines experiment in self-rule

Today’s deep state government and the United States founders’ principals are compared and contrasted in a book by Shawano author Mart Grams. In “The Failed Experiment: Was Hamilton Right,” published earlier this year by Xlibris, Grams talks about how today’s divisiveness stems from what he says are misinterpretations of the United States Constitution.

According to Grams, the founders and framers of the Constitution assumed a government “of the people, by the people and for the people.” For him, that government is now dying.

Were the framers wrong? Were the ideas of Alexander Hamilton right? Is man incapable of self-rule? Grams says no. He believes that it is time to retake that government. “This experiment in self-rule was not a pipe dream, not a hoax, not impossible, but a reality that we’ve let slip through our hands,” he said, inviting Americans to learn more about their history and get involved with our current state of government.

Sat
29
Sep

Making Native American friends enriching, educational

I lived in Shawano until I was 5 years old. Then my family moved to Marion where I attended grade school and high school. After getting married in 1964, my hubby and I made our home in Shawano, where we have lived and worked.

My career was in the financial field. I was given the opportunity to attend a school that taught security in the workplace. Along with the schooling, I received on-the-job training and later became the head of security at a local bank. As a service, the bank offered to provide security training to businesses. I was invited to provide that training to many local businesses including area casinos.

The training included counterfeit detection, how to respond to a bomb threat, proper procedures during a robbery or burglary, and ways to deal with a disgruntled customer.

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