Community

Fri
28
Jul

Culinary Origins: The iconic Wisconsin fish fry


Leader Photo by Greg Mellis Wisconsin residents love their Friday fish fries. Many people enjoy having their fish with tartar sauce and coleslaw, with a beer to wash it down.

The fish fry represents Wisconsin’s food culture almost as much as cheese. So how did it become such an important part of Wisconsin history? No doubt, religion, and the Catholic church in particular, played a central role.

One myth claims that a powerful medieval pope made a secret pact with local fishermen to help prop up the sagging fishing industry by making Fridays meat-free. The presumed result was that millions of Catholics began eating fish on Friday as part of the religious observance. Interesting story, but is it true?

Fri
28
Jul

Sacred Heart schedules preschool, 4-K open house

Sacred Heart Catholic School in Shawano will hold an open house for its preschool and 4-K programs from 5:30-7 p.m. Aug. 7.

The event will offer newly registered and prospective families the opportunity to witness firsthand what students in those classrooms learn, participate in, experience and create.

Families are invited to explore the preschool and 4K classrooms, and chat with preschool teacher Stacey Dickmann and the new 4-K teacher, Michelle Powers.

Enrollment and tuition assistance information will be available, and there will be a raffle to win a $150 tuition credit for the upcoming school year. All families, in any grade, who register before Aug. 13 will also receive a $100 tuition credit per student as part of the school’s “Summer Special” incentive.

Thu
27
Jul

Exhibitors can still enter art and craft fair

The 49th annual Shawano County Art & Craft Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday at Mielke Park. It is one of the longest running annual outdoor art and craft shows in the area.

The Shawano County Arts Council sponsors the event.

Once only drawing, painting and some pottery were exhibited at the fair, but director Cheryl Folkerts noted that now many jewelers, sculptors, photographers, potters, weavers, quilters, wood workers and others too varied to mention participate.

“Every year we have new artists and fine crafters, with unique new offerings for fair goers,” she said.

The exhibitors come from near and far, including Rhinelander, Oconto, Oconto Falls, Madison, Appleton, Milwaukee, Dodgeville, Algoma, Forestville, Escanaba, Iron River, Wautoma, Suring and more.

Paulette Anderson, of Wisconsin Rapids, is well-known as the “cranberry lady” who specializes in using cranberries to make candles, potpourri, candy and other items.

Thu
27
Jul

ThedaCare feels like home to Shawano LPN


Contributed Photo Stephanie Nielson works as a licensed practical nurse at ThedaCare Physicians-Shawano.

Some say nursing is the heart of health care. Stephanie Nielson, licensed practical nurse at ThedaCare Physicians-Shawano, couldn’t agree more.

“Nursing is my passion,” Nielson said. “I love working with the patients.”

Nielson has been with ThedaCare for more than a year. She is a practice associate, so she works with many different providers each day. She loves the variety.

“I did my clinicals at ThedaCare to become an LPN,” Nielson said. “I am also a patient and just loved the atmosphere here. It’s so positive and uplifting. I couldn’t wait to put in my application to join the team when I became licensed.”

While she enjoys working with all ages of patients, she especially enjoys working with the elderly.

Thu
27
Jul

Youngster takes helping others seriously


Photo by Carol Wagner Charles LaRock, right, has a food pantry by his home in Shawano. He is shown with his mother, Sadie Cornelius.

Charles LaRock continues his mission to help people who are hungry.

The Shawano Leader did a feature story on LaRock in November when a TV commercial prompted him to launch a series of food drives to help local families that had fallen on hard times.

A month and a half ago, he started a food pantry at his home at 1134 S. Franklin St.

“Anybody can use it,” said LaRock, 11, who will be a fifth-grader at Olga Brener Intermediate School this fall. “We have three to four people each day.”

His concern about hunger started when he saw a commercial that featured two girls coming home from school.

“One had food and the other didn’t,” LaRock said.

Thu
27
Jul

TOMATO TIME


Photo by Rob Zimmer Midsummer is the time when many common tomato diseases begin to appear in the garden. Most can be prevented by preparing early and planting correctly.

Photo by Rob Zimmer One of the leading causes of tomato troubles is inconsistent watering, which can lead quickly to poor flowering, fruiting and a host of fungal and other diseases.

It is during mid and late summer that many gardeners begin to experience disease problems with tomatoes. Weather conditions, moisture and planting time are among the biggest factors that help tomato diseases propagate.

Because of heavy moisture throughout the growing season this summer so far, and an early spring start that tempted many gardeners to plant early, tomato diseases this season have been a popular topic.

Fortunately, many diseases of tomato plants can be prevented with simple, basic gardening techniques and by following proper tomato planting times and spacing requirements.

Here are tips to help prevent tomato diseases in your garden beds.

Consistent watering

Sat
22
Jul

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Members of the St. Paul Men’s Club at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Bonduel working at the Red Barn at Charlie’s County Market recently include, from left, sitting, Peter Schmidt and Larry Luepke; standing, Randy Genke, Mike Hille, Ray Banaszynski and Dale Lintner.

The St. Paul Men’s Club at St. Paul Lutheran church in Bonduel helps spread the Gospel and aid people in any way it can.

“It’s a good fellowship,” President Randy Genke said.

Most of the 32 members are very active helping the church, local communities and the world.

Last year the club gave out $3,200, with $1,000 going to the church general fund. Club members also made a three-year commitment to help with school remodeling.

The club also donates to the St. Paul Church and School Scholarship Fund.

“It’s for anyone who would like to further their education for the ministry or becoming a parochial teacher,” Genke said.

The club has donated to the new Wolf River Lutheran High School, the Orphan Grain Train, which helps people all over the world, and the St. Paul Endowment Fund.

Members helped with the project last year to send 5,000 5-gallon pails to Haiti so people can more easily transport water.

Sat
22
Jul

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Jackie Schmidt, left, and Sandy Gawryleski hold baskets that will be raffled at the St. Francis Solanus Catholic Church picnic in Gresham on Sunday.

Jackie Schmidt and Sandy Gawryleski are preparing for the St. Francis Solanus Catholic Church picnic in Gresham on Sunday.

Schmidt was born in Wittenberg and graduated from Bowler High School. She married and farmed with her husband of 55 years, Louie. For 16 years, she was a clerk at Hoffman Gambles Store in Gresham. The couple has six children, 17 grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren. They live in the town of Red Springs, where Jackie has been the town treasurer for 29 years. She volunteers with the ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano Auxiliary and the Gresham Area Advancement Association. She enjoys vegetable and flower gardening.

Sat
22
Jul

The garden

We’ve had a vegetable garden for as long as I can remember. When my husband and I switched houses with his folks years ago, I looked with dismay at my mother-in-law’s unnervingly large garden, my heart sinking. I remember having a conversation with her, lamenting the fact that I could never keep up with all of that. The dear woman, bless her heart, gave me permission by scoffing away my dismay, “You do what you want!”

Through the years, we’ve had good gardens, and then we’ve had gardens that were nothing more than a haven for weeds. When the kids were small and we were milking cows and keeping up with everything, the garden was basically there to dig out whatever random vegetable that happened to survive.

One winter we had a conversation about switching up the garden area, as our garden, or lack thereof, was seriously starting to bug both of us. “Let’s try a different spot,” my husband suggested. I was up for anything.

Sat
22
Jul

Aunt Gertie hanging in there at 103

July is the month that my Aunt Gertie turns 103 years old. This year, she had to spend it in a rehab center, where she is getting physical therapy to get some of her strength and balance back. She had a problem and needed someone to come and help her up. From there, they took her to the hospital.

Nothing serious was found, but she was unable to return to her apartment until she was stronger. I was unable to travel to southern Wisconsin to visit her on her birthday. However, I got there a week later.

Since the rehab center is in Burlington, I went through some of the area that had been flooded recently. I went past the ball diamond that was completely underwater, and the rivers still seemed very high. A wrong turn took me in an area where garbage was piled by the street. I imagine those homes had flooded basements.

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