Community

Thu
30
Aug

Retired teacher publishes children’s book

Mart Grams’ granddaughter is afraid of Halloween. He asked her why, and she told him it was because of the masks people are wearing during the celebration. Grams talked with her about being afraid of other things, and it gave him an idea to write a book about children’s fears.

In his book, “Grandpa, I’m Afraid,” (published by Xlibris), Grams discusses the subject of fear among children. In the book, he and his granddaughters engage themselves in a conversation dealing with the things they are commonly afraid, of which include monsters, the dark, clowns or people in costume, insects, medicine and shots.

“Children are normally afraid of lots of things,” Grams said. “Parents often do not know how to deal with them and their fears. This book gives readers an example of a conversation between me and my granddaughters to help both parents and children.”

Thu
30
Aug

Marx holds on to the night at North Star

Richard Marx will perform live on Nov. 16 at North Star Mohican Casino Resort, W12180 County Road A, Bowler.

Tickets start at $35 and will go on sale Wednesday.

Marx is known for iconic ballads like “Right Here Waiting,” “Now and Forever” and “Hold on to the Night.” The singer/songwriter and producer is also responsible for “To Where You Are,” the first hit single from Josh Groban’s debut album, as well as N’Sync’s “This I Promise You.” In 2004, he earned Song of the Year for a collaboration that produced Luther Vandross’ “Dance with My Father.”

“Richard Marx is a powerhouse of talent,” said Michael Bonakdar, general manager of North Star Mohican Casino Resort. “We are thrilled to have him perform here and look forward to a great show.”

Wed
29
Aug

Newest barn quilt honors barbers with its pattern


Photo by Jim Leuenberger Shown with Shawano County’s 339th barn quilt are, seated, Dave and Alice Laux; standing from left, Linda and Jim Laux, Jenny Ballwahn, Jim and Kathy Cummings, and their children, Courtney, Brendan and Christa.

Shawano County’s 339th barn quilt is now on display on a barn at N4143 State Highway 22, a few miles south of Shawano. The farm is owned by Jim Laux. The quilt was sponsored by Full House Realty of Shawano.

The quilt pattern the Laux family selected is called Barber Pole in recognition of Jim’s mother, Alice Laux, who has been a hairdresser for 45 years; his sister, Kathy Cummings, who is also a hairdresser; and his dad, Dave Laux, who was a barber for 59 years.

Julius Piehl, Jim’s great-grandfather, came to the United States from Frankfurt, Germany, arriving in New York with $21 in his pocket. He had friends in Plymouth, Wisconsin, where he worked to save money to buy a farm and eventually to bring his wife, Bertha, to be with him in America. They had six children — Augusta, Anna, Gustav and Tillie, along with two others who died in infancy.

Wed
29
Aug

Yesterday tended by today’s hands


Photo by Charles Collier Nick LeNoble and his son, Caleb, of Marion, share a passion for car restoration, and are putting their handiness to use with MAHS. Here, the two stand with “a poor man’s tractor” restored by Nick, in front of the Ray Arndt Historical Museum.

Photo by Charles Collier Mary Kautz, of Clintonville, flips through a condensed history of the Marion Area Historical Society during the group’s 30th anniversary celebration Saturday.

The Marion Area Historical Society celebrated its 30-year anniversary Saturday at the Ray Arndt Historical Museum on Ramsdell Road, casting the 125-member organization into dual roles as historical subject as well as documentarian.

The historical society has proven an exceptional example of the latter over the last three decades as shown by the expansive museum named after Ray Arndt, an ardent contributor and supporter of preserving the area’s past.

Arndt made headlines last year when he donated a more than 2,000-piece collection of old and antique tools, the oldest being a corn planter from 1863 during the throes of the Civil War. But the 100-year-old spitfire has been integral to Marion’s history since long before.

Gesturing toward a stuffed horse and display buggy carrying a mother and daughter in their Sunday best, Arndt recalled one of the last times he was at the reins inside such a carriage.

Sat
25
Aug

Phones go from luxury to everyday necessity

On rare occasions, a phone rings in my car. It is not my cellphone, which I would not answer while driving. It is the car ringing, with an area lighting up, showing a call coming in. I purchased this used car last year in January, so I am not sure if the previous owner had this hooked up, or if it is part of the car, but I don’t know the number and have never figured out how to answer.

Since it happened again last week, I was reminded about phones and how much they make life easier and harder at the same time.

The first telephone I remember seeing was at my grandpa’s house, rural Shawano. It hung on the wall, with a cone-shaped thing to speak into, and a crank on the right side. I don’t remember anyone ever calling, or anyone calling out, so with my child’s mind, I wasn’t sure if it worked or not, but I thought it was pretty special that grandpa had a phone, and we did not.

Sat
25
Aug

II Edition playing polka for 25 years


Photo by Grace Kirchner For more than 25 years, the II Edition Polka Band has been playing for worship services. From left, Bud Gennrich at the piano, Dale Oesterbrink and Gene Lettau playing trumpets, Dan Zupon is hidden but plays the drums and Terry Lettau plays the concertina.

Gene Lettau and his II Edition Polka Band played for the worship services at St. Martin Lutheran Church in Clintonville on July 29 in observance of Rural Life Sunday.

The band has been playing the happy music at area church services for more than 25 years. They’ve played at Methodist, Catholic, Lutheran and Church of Christ worship services.

Gene’s musical career began when he was in fifth or sixth grade in school and he discovered the trumpet. He played in the band all through grade school and high school. Eventually, he formed a band of his own.

He met his wife, Terry, who also had a band. Soon they were married and have been together for the past 45 years. Terry’s band dissolved, and she joined II Edition.

The five piece band includes Bud Gennrich, of Merrill, who plays the piano; Dale Oesterbrink, of Wausau, who plays trumpet; and Dan Zupon, of Antigo, who plays drums. Terry plays the concertina, and Gene the trumpet. They reside near Wittenberg.

Sat
25
Aug

Doc heading on Cannonball run in September

A very popular destination spot is right in our backyard. If you haven’t been to Doc’s Timeline Saloon and BBQ, you will want to stop in. It is located at W2707 State Highway 29.

There are so many things to see. The gift shop features unique gift ideas, along with a limited selection of motorcycle parts. In the back of the store is a workshop area featuring two workbenches that belonged to each of Doc’s grandfathers. Many of Doc’s tools from his original shop that opened in 1979 are displayed.

There is also a great little antique shop, filled with a variety of collectibles, jewelry and artwork of local vendors. I was delighted to find a wonderful old Raggedy Ann doll there recently.

Sat
25
Aug

Kitchen Maids working on shawls

Members of the Kitchen Maids Club of the Shawano County Association of Home and Community Education have recently been working on a project close to their hearts.

They have been busy sewing shawls for patients who are receiving treatments at the Fox Valley Hematology and Oncology Clinic located in ThedaCare Medical Center in Shawano. Staff members will use the shawls to drape over the arms and shoulders of their patients during infusions. They are especially warm and comforting during those difficult times.

The service project prepared the group for the reality of what was to come for one of its very own members. A member’s young granddaughter was recently diagnosed with a severe form of childhood cancer and is also benefitting from a shawl and pillow made by member Patricia Arnold.

Members of the Kitchen Maids are planning to continue sewing these shawls and are looking to supply other clinics in the area with their beautiful shawls.

Thu
23
Aug

IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE FIRST LADY


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Wisconsin first lady Tonette Walker, left, talks with Matty Mathison about some of the features of Shawano as the group leaves Kuckuk Park on Wednesday to return to Sturgeon Park. The walk was part of the Walk With Walker event held Wednesday by the Wisconsin Department of Tourism.

Wisconsin first lady Tonette Walker joined more than 50 area residents for a stroll through some of Shawano’s outdoor amenities Wednesday with her Walk With Walker program.

Walker and the group got to see the amenities of Sturgeon Park, where thousands flock annually for the annual Wolf River sturgeon spawning, as well as the new barn quilt next to Judd Park and the learning centers along walking paths in Kuckuk Park.

This is the 68th Walk With Walker event, facilitated through the Wisconsin Department of Tourism, and the first for Shawano County. Walker’s husband, Scott Walker, had previously conducted similar walks in Milwaukee when he was the county executive to promote fitness and outdoor recreation, but she moved the idea to the state level when her husband became governor in 2011.

Sat
18
Aug

Butcher day

After months of feeding, watering and changing areas, my chickens are gone. Well, technically, they’ve gone from outside in the chicken houses to inside my freezer. Butcher day had arrived.

We had first thought we’d butcher them ourselves. After reading up on butchering techniques and realizing we did not know from straight up what we were doing, we checked out other options.

My husband works part time at a job which takes him off the farm a few days a week. One of his co-workers happens to be Amish. They were talking one day, and the Amish farmer and his family offered to butcher our chickens for us. He and my husband settled on a fee, and the date was set.

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