Community

Sat
23
Feb

Dogs teach us lessons on life, love and loss

Long ago (my childhood) and far away (rural Clintonville) there was me and Mupsy. Wherever I went, he was sure to follow. He’d help me bring home the cows for milking, keeping them all in line.

Often, we would go down that long lane to the west of the buildings with open fields on both sides. Then take the fork to the right into the woods near the gravel pit, near where Pa cooked maple syrup over an open pan in the spring. Then we’d wind our way to the left on the cow path, out to the magic spot deep in the back part of the woods.

Hills and valleys awaited us there, and my imagination could roam free. Mupsy would roam a bit there to check things out. In the springtime, a tiny creek would appear in the valley from the snow melt. I usually spent some time sitting on a rock to contemplate life. Thinking back now, I wonder just what would I be concerned about? Life was pretty good in those innocent days.

Sat
23
Feb

Difference between symptoms for heart attack, stroke

Cardiovascular disease includes heart attack (coronary artery disease), high blood pressure (hypertension), congestive heart failure, and brain attack (stroke), according to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services. In both Wisconsin and the United States, heart disease is the number one cause of death and stroke is the number five cause of death.

“Call 911; that’s the most important first reaction,” said Tina Bettin, advanced practice nurse prescriber at ThedaCare Physicians-Manawa. “No matter what type of cardiovascular event a person is experiencing, getting professional medical assistance as soon as possible is critical.”

Common symptoms of a heart attack are center chest discomfort such as pressure, squeezing, or pain that may or may not be constant; discomfort in other areas of the upper body like the jaw, arms, neck, center of the upper back or stomach; shortness of breath; cold sweat; nausea and lightheadedness

Fri
22
Feb

CMN offers home health aide course

Area residents age 16 and older can apply now for the eight-week Home Health Aide course that starts March 18 at the College of Menominee Nation.

Students who successfully complete the course are prepared for seeking work as an independent provider or with a home care agency. Since its inception, more than 1,000 students have registered for the program at CMN to prepare for employment or improve their ability to aid family members in need.

Students in the course learn how to assist with the personal care of individuals of all ages with disabilities or illness. Along with first aid, CPR and day-to-day caregiving, students will develop skills in verbal and non-verbal communications and in written communication related to charting and documentation. Issues such as the patient/caregiver relationship, time and stress management, team work, conflict resolution, coping with death and cultural sensitivity will also be addressed.

Fri
22
Feb

Clintonville foundation awards six grants

The Clintonville Area Foundation has awarded $9,470 in grants to six charitable organizations serving the Clintonville area.

The grants, which benefit a range of community causes, were awarded from a variety of charitable funds within the community foundation this year.

“The foundation’s mission to enhance and improve the social, cultural, educational, health and general well being of the people in the Clintonville Area was well served with these grants,” said Joanne Doornink, advisory board chairperson. “We are happy to award these grants to benefit our community.”

Eligible nonprofit organizations submitted grant requests through the foundation’s annual competitive process. The Foundation’s volunteer grants committee members recommend grant recipients to the advisory board for approval.

The following grants were approved:

Thu
21
Feb

Free seeds at FRESH Project’s last winter market

It’s not too early to start planning your summer garden, and the FRESH Project is helping by giving out free vegetable seed packets.

To advance its mission of making healthy food accessible to all, the FRESH Project will hand out free seeds at its last winter market, which will be held March 2 from 8 a.m. to noon at the First Presbyterian Church, 100 Presbyterian St., Shawano.

“We’re all about fresh produce to ensure good, healthy food for everyone,” said Barb Mendoza, executive director. “In addition to the seed distribution, this will be the last opportunity to visit the winter market for the season. It’s a great time to come to the winter market and buy local. We will have meat and vegetable producers along with bakery and craft vendors. There will also be live music.” The FRESH Project’s new cookbook, filled with healthy recipes supplied by community members, will be available for $10.

Wed
20
Feb

Top risks for heart disease identified

February is National Heart Month, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that half of all Americans have at least one of the top-three risk factors for heart disease — high blood pressure, high cholesterol or cigarette use.

Prevea Health and HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital encourage people to be aware of the risk factors and take steps now to improve their heart health.

• High blood pressure occurs when the pressure of the blood in your arteries and blood vessels is too high. If not controlled, this can affect your heart, kidneys and brain. Often called a silent killer, many people do not notice symptoms that signal high blood pressure. Lowering blood pressure by changes in lifestyle or medication can reduce the risk of heart disease and heart attack.

Sat
16
Feb

Slipping, sliding through winter no fun anymore

With four named snowstorms and only halfway through February, I’ve had enough of winter. I know there are some of you that gleefully play in the snow, and yippee for you. Give me green grass, the aroma of a freshly-cut field of alfalfa, or slipping on flip flops to run to the garden to gather fresh veges for our supper; that’s more my style.

Sat
16
Feb

More choices on television, but still not much to watch

A television is a funny thing, and one that did not arrive in my life until I was in seventh grade. Those were the days of wall to wall westerns, such as “Have Gun Will Travel,” “Maverick,” and of course “Gunsmoke.” Those were also the days of “I Love Lucy” and “The Ed Sullivan Show,” which were watched on a regular basis in my childhood home.

Most of these shows can still be seen as reruns on several cable networks, as can old game shows. It seems strange, that now, instead of watching the new programing, I watch a lot of the older shows.

In my teen years, I rocked out with “American Bandstand,” hosted by Dick Clark, and the “Mickey Mouse Club,” with that catchy theme song. All I need to do is think back, and I can sing it out. There were crime shows, such as “Dragnet,” and “77 Sunset Strip.” “Leave it to Beaver” was probably my favorite sitcom, but, in those days, comedy was actually laugh out loud funny, without the innuendo.

Sat
16
Feb

SING, ALL YE FAITHFUL


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Wolf River Homeschoolers, from left, Marie Kluge, Misty Luckow, Annika Jannusch and Charli Ritter rehearse a dance number for “Pilgrim” Thursday afternoon at Clintonville High School. Kluge helped to choreograph the performers for this song.

The Wolf River Homeschoolers Performing Arts program has always been Christian-based, but until now, the musicals they have performed did not directly address God.

The homeschoolers will be performing “Pilgrim,” a musical based off of “Pilgrim’s Progress” set in a contemporary time period that looks at what happens to a young man trying to stay on the Lord’s path and being tempted by worldly excesses.

“This is the first time that we’ve done (something) explicitly Christian,” said Charlene Stuewer, the show’s director. “It was a good time for us to go back to what we are about, our foundation. It’s been hard to find shows that can accommodate our needs.”

The musical adapts John Bunyan’s classic tale and follows a young man named Christian as he attempts to reach the Celestial City. For two hours, the show runs the gamut of biblical themes from faith to repentance, friendship to hardship, and temptation to death and eternity.

Sat
16
Feb

Trees went down so homesteads could go up in Shawano

Shawano was once covered with dense forests. In researching Shawano’s history, I learned land was cheap and plentiful in the mid-1800s. Anyone who was physically able could clear land for a homestead. However, that was no easy job. Early settlers cut the trees and piled them up. When they had a large pile, they lit it on fire to clear the area. Imagine the beautiful hardwood, cedar and pine that had to be burned to give the early settlers a place to build, plant a garden and start farming.

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