Community

Thu
20
Apr

Choose summer shoes with structure, support

The shift from cold winter days to warm sunny weather is accompanied by a welcome change of footwear. Some people shed their heavy boots and head outside for more exercise. Others want to show off their pretty pedicures or fling off their flip flops and wiggle their toes in the sand.

Dr. Kristen Sandoe, a fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeon with ThedaCare Orthopedic Care, has some advice for choosing shoes that will put (and keep) a spring in your step.

“Comfort and proper alignment of the feet affects all your joints, especially your knees, hips, and back,” Sandoe said. Poorly fitting shoes can lead to foot and toe issues that may not show up for years down the road. “Good shoe choices help avoid fatigue, pain, and deformities that could cause you to miss out on a lot of fun. I advise my patients to make smart shoe choices for comfort today and they’ll benefit in the years to come.”

First, look for shoes that are designed to:

Thu
20
Apr

JOYFUL BLOOMS


Photo by Rob Zimmer The new salvia in salmon is a breathtaking plant that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies with its tube-shaped blooms.

Photo by Rob Zimmer Nemesia, fragrant, light and airy makes a perfect container filler in potted planters and hanging baskets.

Every year, plant growers and breeders introduce dozens of new annuals into the marketplace, vying for the attention of gardeners and yard decorators everywhere.

Year after year, the tastes of gardeners themselves change, as well. What one gardener may like one year may not catch their eye the next.

Many amazing new annuals have captured my attention this year, along with some old favorites I always love to include. Here are some of my favorites that I hope you’ll try in your containers, garden beds and displays.

Annuals are those flowers and decorative plants that complete their blooming cycle and die in one growing season. The plant does not return year after year, unless it is a self-seeder. These plants normally do not survive our winters.

Perennials are those plants that return, often bigger and bigger, with each new spring. They are cold hardy in Wisconsin and will survive our winters to return year after year.

Sat
15
Apr

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner The St. Joseph Indian School Reunion committee includes, from left, Joyce Ninham, Tony Waupochick and Wiladean Peters.

St. Joseph Indian School in Keshena began in 1880 when the Franciscans invited the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet from St. Louis, Missouri, to teach there. The school continued to have a huge influence on the community for the next 100 years.

To recognize the school’s role, the parish council at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena formed a committee to plan a reunion, which will be held April 30.

“People that I’ve run into said they are coming,” said Wiladean Peters, a committee member who is also on the parish council.

Peters didn’t attend the school, but members of her husband’s family did.

The school, which was located near the current church on state Highway 47-55, began with kindergarten through eighth grade. It later added ninth through 12th grades, but eventually returned to K-8 until it closed in 1980.

Sat
15
Apr

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Carol Jaeger is one of four coordinators for the Divine Savior Lutheran Church food pantry.

Carol Jaeger is one of four coordinators at the Divine Savior Lutheran Church food pantry.

Born in Green Bay, she graduated from Mishicot High School. Jaeger worked at Mirro Aluminum in Manitowoc for 37 years and then at WG&R Bedding for five years before retiring.

Jaeger and her husband of 47 years, Ronald, who is also retired, have a daughter and two grandchildren. They live near Underhill, where Jaeger has a large flower and vegetable garden.

Q How long have you volunteered at the food pantry?

A “I’ve been with them for five years.”

Q How did you get started?

A “We originally came from Manitowoc County. We bought a place here and joined the church six years ago. The first year I retired I had a garden and flowers, but it just wasn’t enough. I talked to Mary Krueger, Sandy Schultz and Joyce Frisque, and within the month I was a coordinator. It’s work, but I totally enjoy it.”

Q What do you do?

Sat
15
Apr

Happy Easter

I’ve been blessed that my lifetime was spent caring for animals and working the land the good Lord entrusted to us. The Word of God has many similarities with farming, with many references to planting the seed, tending it and watching it grow.

One day I was working out with my Jennifer, participating in her low-impact aerobicexercise program called “Rise-Up.” (8 a.m., Direct TV, NRB Channel 378) As usual, she refers to many scriptural passages as she encourages her participants to keep on keeping on. This morning her timely chatter caught my interest as I was prayerfully considering what I should write about for Easter. The Lord has a way of putting things in our path at exactly the right time and at the right place. Our job is to shut up and listen, and then act.

Sat
15
Apr

Don’t let fun overshadow meaning of Easter

As I sit and contemplate the Easter preparations, I will be making for the family meal on Easter Sunday, my thoughts also travel to the Bible, and the accounts of Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and then the alleluias of joy at the empty tomb on Easter Sunday.

I often wonder how we got to this point in 2017, when the Easter candy, baskets and the like take up residence in stores right after Valentine’s Day.

As a child growing up in the late 1940s and early ’50s, commercial interests did not creep into our lives as they do now with television and the internet. The Sears, Spiegel and Montgomery Ward catalogs were king at our farmhouse.

With their arrival, my brother and I would look and wish, and my parents would look and wish. Sometimes, a few things were ordered, but mostly they were not to be afforded.

Fri
14
Apr

Box in the Wood hits the Suite spot


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Sidney, played by Michael Brunner, shakes hands with his ex-wife’s assistant, Grace, played by Leah Allen, in a scene from “London Suite.” The Neil Simon comedy has some adult themes, so the Box in the Wood Theatre Guild is recommending that audience members be 14 or older.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Anne Ferris, played by Karen Fuller, listens as Dr. McMerlin, center, played by Brandon Byng, gives her instructions on how to help him off the floor after he has thrown out his back in the process of helping Mark Ferris, played by Geoffrey Madsen, with his own back issues in a scene from “London Suite.” Box in the Wood Theatre Guild will perform the Neil Simon comedy for two weeks beginning Thursday.

If walls could talk, they’d probably tell tales like the ones in the Neil Simon comedy “London Suite.”

The play will be performed by Box in the Wood Theatre Guild for two weeks beginning Thursday, showcasing four scenes taking place in one hotel suite across the pond.

The first scene involves the Welsh novelist Brian Cronin discovering that his manager, Billy Fox, is about to run off with all of his money.

The second scene focuses on Sharon and Lauren Semple, a mother and daughter on a shopping trip. Lauren is trying to convince Sharon to go on a date with an elderly man, which the mother has no intention of doing.

The third scene is less comedic and more dramatic when divorced couple Sidney and Diana Nichols arrive. Sidney needs money from Diana to help pay the medical bills for his male lover, who is dying from cancer.

Fri
14
Apr

Class helps Prokash celebrate 90th birthday


Photo by Carol Wagner On Tuesday, the Strong Bones class at Sacred Heart Catholic Church surprised Rose Prokash with a small celebration of her 90th birthday. Shown are, from left, Mary Nellis, Jeanne Kaczorowski, Mary Alexander, Prokash, Lois Brewster, Vickie Hetue and Sally Hesse.

Rose Prokash just finished up her Strong Bones class on Tuesday when instructor Jeanne Kaczorowski and others in the class surprised her with cupcakes, balloons and cards in honor of her 90th birthday.

Prokash will officially celebrate her birthday Saturday with about 150 family members at the Shawano Lake County Park pavilion. Prokash has 10 children, 28 grandchildren, four stepgrandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren and four great-stepgrandchildren.

Asked about her life, Prokash said: “I don’t really worry. I wait until things happen, and then I decide what to do about it.”

She grew up on a farm in Kewaunee County and said the family ate really good food. She is the last sibling of nine.

She and her husband, Floyd, were married for 54 years before his death in 1974. Prokash didn’t get to celebrate her birthday much when married because her husband was always busy on income tax day, she said.

Thu
13
Apr

Community garden meeting set for April 24

The Shawano County WIC Program and University of Wisconsin-Extension have joined forces with Zion Lutheran Church in Shawano to sponsor a community garden.

Interested gardeners are invited to an organizational meeting at 5:30 p.m. April 24 at Zion Lutheran Church, 1254 S. Union St. The garden is located at the corner of Lincoln and Zingler streets, next to the church.

In a community garden, gardeners have their own plots and are responsible for planting, weeding, watering, harvesting and plot clean-up. They can keep or share everything they raise.

Water is provided on-site. There is an $8 fee for a basic 10-by-10-foot plot. Larger plots are available for an additional charge. The fee covers the cost of water and tilling.

Thu
13
Apr

FIRST COLOR


Photo by Rob Zimmer Among the first garden blooms in April are the tiny, rock garden or bulbous irises, in many shades of blue, white, purple and yellow.

Photo by Rob Zimmer Crocuses are an excellent choice for a quick burst of early color in the yard and garden. They can be naturalized right into lawn areas or used in garden beds and borders.

With the warmth of April come the first colorful blooms of the season. Our recent warm spell has coaxed many springtime favorites into bloom, colorful spring gems that brighten our winter weary landscapes.

Chances are, you’ve already seen the first colorful crocuses burst into spring glory. These low-growing bulbs are often among the first flowers to bloom each year. In shades of blue, purple, white and yellow, crocuses are an excellent choice for naturalizing into the yard or displaying in garden beds. These are fall planted bulbs that bloom the following spring.

Another early bloomer is Siberian squill, the tiny, cobalt blue flower you see in masses at times as a decorative lawn cover soon after snow melt. While these colorful blooms add a breathtaking beauty to the April landscape, many gardening groups are warning against planting them, as these tiny beauties can be quite aggressive and spread fast into native habitats.

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