Community

Thu
22
Nov

Grateful for family closeness

As the last of the autumn leaves fall from the trees, I sit here glancing out my kitchen window, contemplating the question brought to me: “Why do I give thanks?” As I glance over into the living room, there sits my wonderful, caring husband. He is whispering into our 1-month-old granddaughter’s ear. I ask, “What secrets are you telling her?” He responds, “No secrets. Just letting her know how blessed she is to have you as a grandmother and that I love you with all my heart.”

It is so easy to take people for granted, or even to complain and become angry because they do not meet our every wish, but we need to give thanks for those around us – our spouses, our children, our relatives, our friends and others who help us in some way.

Thu
22
Nov

Thanksgiving, a time for sharing stories

As the leaves turn crimson and begin to fall, we notice other signs of autumn — the geese flying south, sunsets coming earlier each day and the need to grab a jacket to ward off the bite of the early morning cold. As the days of fall grow fewer, our thoughts turn to the upcoming holiday season and our memories of Thanksgiving past.

For many, Thanksgiving brings the opportunity for quality time with family and friends. It also provides an opportunity for reflection on the many things that we are thankful for. Quite often, we are so wrapped up in the challenges that daily life brings that we tend to take for granted the gifts that have been bestowed upon us. The treasure of family and friendship.

Thu
22
Nov

Local physician assistant honored

Brenda K. Balthazor was recently named Physician Assistant of the Year by the Wisconsin Academy of Physician Assistants. Balthazor is a physician assistant with the Aspirus Health System and practices at the Aspirus Birnamwood Clinic.

Balthazor was one of six finalists from a field of hundreds of physician assistants across the state.

“I was thrilled to hear that Brenda was the recipient,” said Andy Barth, CEO of Aspirus Langlade Hospital. “She brings a deep commitment to our mission of healing, promoting health and strengthening our communities.”

The annual award honors a physician assistant who, among other criteria, demonstrates excellence in service to patients and exhibits involvement in the community.

Thu
22
Nov

SINGING AND DANCING FOR ‘PEANUTS’


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Linus, played by Ben Huber, left, and Charlie Brown, played by Brandon Byng, work on a book report about the classic “Peter Rabbit” in a scene from “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” The show is from the 1999 Broadway revival of the original musical, which is more than 50 years old.

The Phoenix Players already have two musicals under their belt, but this time, they’re working for “Peanuts.”

The theater troupe based in Clintonville will debut “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” next week with a twist. For the first time, it will be hosting a reception following the opening night’s show.

“We wanted to do something recognizable, and who is more recognizable than Charlie Brown and his friends?” said Brandon Byng, the show’s director and the actor playing the title character. “We’re hoping that will make people curious to come see the show.”

Patrons will be able to interact with the actors, get autographs, photograph selfies and even walk the red carpet. There will also be hors d’oeuvres and refreshments served.

“It’s not required, but we say that, if you want to dress up and make opening night a big event for yourself, you can,” Byng said.

Sat
17
Nov

Church basement women are more like second family


Photo by Leah Lehman Standing with the flowers, which are gifts for those with November birthdays at Homme Home, are Carol Lehman, Elaine Erickson and Betty Kohn. Kohn purchased the gifts.

In the 1970s, I was invited to come to Ladies Aid at my church. At that time, I had two children in school and two toddlers at home. I told the lady who called that I’d have to bring my children with me, and she answered with, “That’s OK. We like children.”

Well, my toddlers were well-behaved when I took them places — they were normal toddlers at home — so it all worked out. Somehow, I joined the Ladies Aid and never realized what that meant.

While we were called Ladies Aid, in the 1990s I learned that I really was a Lutheran church basement woman. It was about that time that I learned about a book by that name and, more recently, there was a play in the Midwest titled “Lutheran Church Basement Women,” which was hilarious. I saw it twice, both times in the Minneapolis area.

Sat
17
Nov

Neglecting friendship results in hurt, loneliness

As I grew up, my dad often gave me words of advice. I remember him saying, “Lorna, always remember, you are no better than anyone else, and no one else is better than you.” He also said, “When you know you’re right, stand up and defend your position, even if you stand alone, but when you’re wrong, be a big enough person to admit it.”

Dad also advised me, “Lorna, live your life so that, when you look in a mirror, you like the person looking back at you.” I must admit, recently I have really disappointed myself. I feel ashamed and do not like the person I see in my mirror.

During my tenure as mayor, I met many wonderful people. One of those people is a lovely lady who I would talk with at various meetings and events. She kindly invited me to be her guest at a few community events. We developed a mutual friendship.

Fri
16
Nov

Goodfellows seek donations for holidays

As part of a 68-year history of assisting those in need, the Clintonville Goodfellows are again seeking donations to make the holiday season brighter for all.

The charitable group founded by Frank Sinkewicz, a former officer of FWD Corporation, has been distributing food, toys and other items to needy individuals for decades. Volunteers are collecting names of potential recipients in the Clintonville and Marion school districts, who will be contacted by a member of Goodfellows to verify the applications.

At the same time, the Goodfellows are seeking donations of money, food, toys, canned goods, mittens, caps, blankets, comforters and other necessary items from churches, civic organizations, individuals and businesses. It requires countless hours of volunteerism by area residents to make this annual program a success.

Fri
16
Nov

Tribal clinic offers high-tech ultrasounds


Contributed Photo Hether Schmid, a registered sonographer with Menominee Tribal Clinic, shows off the cutting-edge Siemens Sequoia, which the tribal clinic purchased recently.

Each year, hundreds of patients of the Menominee Tribal Clinic had been sent to outside facilities for diagnostic ultrasound exams. Starting earlier this month, in partnership with ThedaCare, the clinic has been able to offer a broad range of ultrasound procedures on site, according to Jerry Waukau, tribal clinic administrator.

Waukau said that through the clinic’s imaging connections with ThedaCare, images taken at the clinic can be sent electronically to specialists. Thus the clinic can now offer a range of services, including obstetric, abdominal, pelvic, thyroid, scrotal, kidney, vascular and other scans. Echocardiograms and plans for some needle-guided procedures are also in the works.

Wed
14
Nov

Navy vet speaks of ‘pride across the nation’


Photo by Grace Kirchner Clintonville Mayor Richard Beggs, right, a Navy veteran, introduces James Vissers, a Navy veteran from Appleton, at Clintonville’s Veterans Day ceremony. Vissers told the veterans that they would not be forgotten as he thanked them for their service and encouraged others to thank our servicemen and women,

Clintonville Mayor Richard Beggs, master of ceremonies at this year’s Veterans Day memorial service, reminded those in attendance that World War I ended 100 years ago Sunday. Though it was chilly for the ceremony and the grounds at the Veterans Memorial on South Main Street were covered in snow, “our veterans endured much worse than this,” Beggs said.

One such veteran is James Vissers of Appleton, who served in the Navy and was Sunday’s guest speaker.

“Today we gather to honor and pay gratitude to those who serve our country,” Vissers said. “There is pride across the nation for those who made the sacrifice.”

He impressed upon the audience the importance of showing gratitude to those who have served.

Sat
10
Nov

Farming, a roller coaster ride

This has been a challenging, roller coaster-ride-type year for farmers. From weather extremes to unstable milk prices, farming is not for the faint of heart. My dear dad unceasingly prayed for strength, wisdom and protection for the “tillers of the land.” That prayer is needed more than ever in the times we are living.

Milk prices forever fluctuate, and although we are not in the trenches any longer, we still feel for the agricultural community, especially those family-owned dairies who are disappearing from our glorious state with alarming frequency. Checking the latest market price, who can make a living on $15.52/per hundredweight milk prices with 70 to 80 cows? It’s either go big or go home.

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