Community

Fri
01
Feb

Celebration honors Revolutionary War hero

Casimir Pulaski Days will take place, March 3-10 and is expected to bring thousands of visitors and locals into the small community.

A kick-off for the celebration is planned for March 3, after the 10:30 a.m. Mass at Assumption BVM Catholic Church. Promote Pulaski, Inc. along with the Pulaski Area Historical Society is hosting the Largest Pie Auction in U.S. History. Anyone that brings a pie will be entered into a drawing to win prizes at the pie auction, and a coupon for the polka dances held on March 8-9.

Fri
01
Feb

LGBTQ support group forming in Shawano

Coming out of the closet for gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgendered people has become easier in recent years with the changing attitudes of society, but there are still plenty who are afraid to admit same-sex attractions or feeling like they’re the opposite sex they were biologically born as.

Skylar Herron is hoping to change that. The Shawano resident is starting an LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) support group that addresses things like coming out to family and friends, internal struggles on certain issues and more.

“I started transitioning about a year and two months ago,” said Herron, who was born male but is in the process of becoming a female. “I noticed in Green Bay that there were no resources for the adults, and for them, the only place was Appleton. I moved here and saw a need in this community, because everyone’s afraid to come out.”

Sat
26
Jan

Phone goes from luxury to necessity

I spent most of my life without a phone, so they have never been a big deal to me. Sure, it is needed at times, to make appointments, or to call in case of emergency.

Life without a phone went along well for me until I was about 25 years old. Then it was simply something to have in the house, in case one of my two small boys were injured or my car didn’t start. The only one I would have a long conversation with was my friend, but other than that, I don’t remember a lot of time spent with a phone.

When I met my future husband to be, the phone became slightly more important, in case he had a farming-caused change of plan for a date. When we got married, and I moved to the Tigerton farm, I continued to have a phone, except it was a party line, where different type of rings would tell you if the call was for you or someone else.

Sat
26
Jan

55 years of marriage had ups, downs and plenty of love

It was a beautiful sunny winter day, and one of the happiest days of my young life. It was my wedding day, Feb. 1, 1964. I was 18 years old. My 19th birthday was on Feb. 22, and we wanted to marry on my birthday. However, the Rev. Ohlrogge did not perform marriages during Lent, so we opted for Feb. 1.

I met my hubby in August 1961. The day I met him, I told my friend Cassandra, “I’m going to marry him someday.” I just knew. He didn’t have that same revelation, so it took a few years before he “popped the question.”

My dad thought we were too young, but he approved of my choice, so he gave us his blessings. I fondly remember that walk down the aisle on daddy’s arm. “Always treat my girl right,” he said, as a tear rolled down his cheek.

Thu
24
Jan

Group plans food drives for Shawano, Bonduel children

The Shawano Area Young Professionals are conducting food drives in Shawano and Bonduel from Feb. 1-15.

The drives will benefit Wee Care in Shawano and Backpack Blessings in Bonduel. These programs provide nutritional support to students most in need on the weekend when school breakfast and lunch programs aren’t available.

Shawano school social workers let Wee Care know how many packs are needed every week. They are currently sending out packs for 52 students who are at Hillcrest Primary School, Olga Brener Intermediate School and Shawano Community Middle School.

Backpack Blessings of Bonduel offers this program through Bonduel Elementary School and St. Paul Lutheran School, where parents may sign up their children for weekly meals. While the organization started in September assisting a few children in need, the number has grown to more than 85 children every week.

Wed
23
Jan

Health department offers tips for cold weather

Dangerously low temperatures are in the forecast for much of the state, and the Wisconsin Department of Health Services is urging residents to plan ahead to keep warm and safe.

“Freezing temperatures, wind chills and winter storms can cause hypothermia, frostbite and even death,” said Vicki Dantoin, health officer for Shawano and Menominee counties. “The best way to stay safe during extreme cold is to be prepared.”

In the 2017-18 winter season, 38 people died from exposure to extreme cold.

To protect yourself and your family, follow these cold-weather safety tips:

• When possible, stay indoors.

• Stock a home emergency kit, including food and water, cell phone and charger, flashlight and batteries, first aid kit, important medications, a weather radio and change of clothes.

• If you have to venture out, dress in several loose-fitting layers. Wear a hat, mittens and snow boots. Use a scarf to cover your mouth and face.

Sat
19
Jan

Farm life turns kids into lifelong workers

Being raised on a farm, we four kids developed a solid work ethic. We just knew how to work. My folks instilled that in us from early on. There was work to do, and we had to pitch in and help. No matter how we felt, even from little on, there were animals to feed, clean and tend. We watched our parents handle morning and night chores; year-round tending to livestock and crops through thick and thin, in all kinds of weather, sick or healthy. According to age, we stepped in and helped out.

Because us kids had to work didn’t mean we didn’t take shortcuts whenever possible. One day, my brother and I were cleaning out a calf pen. I was starting to shake apart wafers from a straw bale with a three-tined fork. Back in the day, we used baled straw for bedding.

“Kay! Wait, let’s let them do it!”

Sat
19
Jan

Family history can be found in stories, documents

Having a cluttered house means I will never become bored. I had been planning to tackle a cabinet, in the basement, for the past year. Finally, the cleaning itch arrived. A couple of things happen when I get the clutter-cleaning itch. First of all, I have to make myself be in the “get rid of it” mood. Yet, I admit that I am also on the lookout for things that I know I have, but can’t find. Such was my quest this past week.

I have lived here since 2005, so I am sure that none of the old farm taxes or slips will be needed for any type of audit. The four-drawer file cabinet is full of those, plus maybe more. I had to be methodical in dealing with the records; some needed to be burned or shredded, but others could go in the recycle bin.

Sat
19
Jan

Many helped make Red Kettle campaign a success

To the editor:

The Red Kettle Campaign, which raised money for the local work of the Salvation Army, touched many lives this season. In the next year, the money will touch the lives of some of our neighbors who will not have money for basic needs.

There are many reasons why this might happen. It may have happened to you once. No matter what the reason, they will need help somehow. It would be good, when they reach out, if we are there to assist them.

The Red Kettle Campaign touched the lives of each person who slid coins or currency through the slot. Perhaps you were one of those generous souls. If you were, thank you. Thank you for sharing your plenty with others who have little.

Were you one of those who wore the red apron or rang the bell to say thank you to joyful givers? Thank you.

Sat
19
Jan

Grandparents put the ‘good’ in good old days

I loved staying at my grandma’s house when I was a young girl in the 1950s. I spent a lot of time in Grandma’s kitchen. Grandma’s cupboards were dark wood — oak, I think. The paper she lined her shelves with had a pretty border that hung over the shelf’s edge.

Grandma’s dishes were dark brown pottery. She had some shiny orange bowls; I believe they were carnival glass. She had some nice platters and dishes from Ecke’s store, too. I remember her water pitcher with painted flowers. On a hot day, Grandma would fill the pitcher with homemade grape or apple juice.

There was a flour bin in Grandma’s cupboard. It fascinated me. She used a big metal scoop to get the flour out of the bin. You would never find a “store bought” loaf of bread in my grandma’s house. I watched as she put the dough in her bread pans and covered them up with a big white “flour sack” dish towel.

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