Community

Sat
10
Nov

Plenty of goods and services at Esker’s Town & Country


Leader Photo by Miriam Nelson Terry Esker, owner of Esker’s Town & Country Hardware store in Wittenberg, stands next to the mural on the south side of his building. “Help is on the Way” by Alicia Rheal was painted in 2008 and features firefighters and EMTs past and present.

When you work at a profession for 40 years, it’s usually because you enjoy it. This holds true for Terry Esker, owner of Esker’s Town and Country, a hardware store in downtown Wittenberg.

Esker worked in construction, building and repairing homes, and he was a frequent customer of the hardware store in Hatley.

“I was 24, and I used to go in there for plumbing and electrical supplies, and one day the owner asked if I wanted to be his partner,” Esker said.

Esker was at the right place at the right time. Phil Thorpe and his brother-in-law Dan Pohl had moved to the area from Milwaukee to run the hardware store in Hatley, but the brother-in-law didn’t like the service work.

Sat
10
Nov

Veteran brother remembered with pride

This past weekend, my sister-in-law Rozanne Robenhagen told me that their family headstone was placed on the gravesite last week. My brother Pat passed away in June. Rozanne said, “I selected a simple stone because we lived a simple life. I think Pat would approve.”

I agree. My brother was a quiet, humble, Christian man. My brother was a veteran. He served in the United States Navy. He served as a hospital corpsman/medical specialist, both with sailors and Marines alike. His military service took him to the Pacific Islands and Japan.

I remember going to my room and crying when he left for the service. He was such a great guy, never saying an unkind word about anyone. He was selected prom king by the student body. He was a great baseball and basketball player. I sure was going to miss him, the big brother who made me so proud.

Sat
10
Nov

Time and love are key ingredients in tasty soup

When the cool, damp fall weather comes upon us, I think of soup. I have been thinking about making my favorite soup for quite some time, but wondered what day I’d be home long enough to actually let it simmer to completion.

When I eat out, I always see what kind of soup they are having and order accordingly. Of course, for my diet’s sake, I try to get one with lots of vegetables. Lentil, bean and pea are on the top of the list, but aren’t found very often.

The first time I had lentil soup was in San Jose, California. I ordered it because I was at a fancy hotel restaurant, and it was one of few things that I could afford. Even though I had no idea what a lentil was, the soup was great.

I spent my life as a farm wife and mother making three hardy meals a day, some of which included soup. Chili was a favorite, and yes, it did have noodles. One kid didn’t like kidney beans, so he took his portion first, and then I added the beans.

Fri
09
Nov

Sauerkraut juice benefitting farmers


Photo by Grace Kirchner GLK Foods has a supply of sauerkraut juice that they are offering to farmers free of charge. Many say they see an increase in their cow production that comes on gradually. GLK Foods is the largest producer of sauerkraut in the world.

Some dairymen in the area have found a way to increase milk production and reduce their costs by adding sauerkraut juice, or SKJ, to their dairy ration.

This comes at a time when low milk prices have caused some challenging times for farmers as they look for ways to cut their costs while increasing efficiency. The idea is new to the area but something that is being done in Germany. The juice is available free from GLK Foods in Bear Creek, 400 Clark St., for the hauling.

According to university studies at Leipzig University in Germany, SKJ has vitamins, enzymes and minerals that improve feed digestion and animal health, help increase milk production and improve reproduction.

“Lactobaccilus plantarum is the microbe that is natural in cabbage and is preserving cabbage while creating positive enzymes that are also immunity boosters,” said Michael Maney, GLK Foods director of technical services, Bear Creek.

Wed
07
Nov

Goodfellows president honored by Lions Club

A lifelong volunteer and president of the Clintonville Goodfellows was honored this year with the Clintonville Lions’ Outstanding Citizen Volunteer award.

Steve Conradt of Clintonville accepted the award at the Lions Club’s recent October dinner and business meeting. Included with the award is a $250 donation to the Clintonville Goodfellows.

“We recognize that we — Lions and non-Lions alike — can all make a difference in our community through service to others,” said Lowell Easley, member of the selection committee. “The club is especially interested in recognizing those non-Lions who have not been otherwise recognized and awarded for their volunteerism.”

Sat
03
Nov

Different generations have (mostly) common threads

I have heard others say, “That’s a generational thing,” or “They’re from another generation.” At various meetings, I’ve heard it said, “We need to figure out how to keep our millennials here.”

A “generation” is described as being all the people born and living in the same time period, viewed collectively. They are further described as social groups who share similar cultural traits, values and preferences.

There are six living generations in the United States. They are: the GI Generation (1901-1926); Mature/Silents (1927-1945); Baby Boomers (1946-1964); Generation X (1965-1980); Generation Y/Millennials (1981-2000); and Generation Z/Boomlets (born after 2001).

Each generation has traits and characteristics. Of course, they are determined by averages, and not all of the traits hold true for everyone born during that period of time.

Sat
03
Nov

Turning back the clock can’t turn back the years

This is that time of year when we get the extra hour. It was taken from us in the spring, but magically it comes back so we can get our extra hour of sleep. I am not really certain which hour that will be, as I have changed from a slug-a-bed, to a “Why am I awake? It’s only 5 a.m.?” Sometimes I can fall back to sleep, but usually I toss and turn in disgust, then just get up.

Of course, being up does not mean being ready to move, as I test my joints one at a time to check on whether they will move. Sometimes I hang on to the side of the walker by my bed just to center myself, and then I head to the bathroom.

Not only is 2018 on the wan, sometimes I think my body is, also. But fall is the time for a few extra aches and pains. I prefer not to dwell on or talk about them. I do my best to simply block them out and ignore, and get myself going to whatever the day has in store.

Sat
03
Nov

Meet Harriett the Therapy Dog


Leader Photo by Miriam Nelson Attending last Thursday’s Homme Home Health and Wellness Fair are, from left, Betty Clabough, Harriett the Therapy Dog and Doris Crick.

Born on an Amish farm and raised with barn cats, Harriett, a 7½-year-old copper golden retriever, has led an interesting life. She was an only puppy, which is rare, and was a Christmas gift for Betty Clabough.

Harriett was afraid of dogs and had to go through special therapy to be able relate to her own species. With the help of dog trainers, Harriett learned to behave like most dogs. She still likes to lay under the gingerbread Christmas tree and bat the ball ornaments; some habits are too tempting to give up.

One of the instructors suggested to Clabough that Harriett might make a good therapy dog because she loves interacting with people.

In order to get her license, Harriett had to overcome one bad habit – jumping on people when she greets them. Clabough, who with her husband, Bob, once owned Clabough Insurance, is well-known around Wittenberg. She took Harriett around to local business owners to help break Harriett of her jumping habit.

Sat
03
Nov

New art teacher at Wittenberg school

Editor’s Note: NEW Media recently chatted with Naomi Engelke, who was hired this year for the Wittenberg Elementary/Middle School art teacher position.

Q: What is your work/education background?

A: This is my first teaching job. I graduated this past May from Viterbo University in La Crosse with a degree in art education.

Q: Tell a little bit about yourself and where you are from?

A: I am from Fort Atkinson, which is located between Madison and Milwaukee. The past five years, I have lived in La Crosse while going to school, and now I live in Stevens Point with my dog, Mia.

Q: What’s your basic philosophy for teaching?

Sat
03
Nov

FRESH Project announces winter market

Vendors are sought for a winter market that will be hosted by the FRESH Project. The market will be held from 8 a.m. to noon on the first Saturdays of December through March at the First Presbyterian Church, 100 Presbyterian St., Shawano.

“We are looking for artists, crafters and farmers who are interested in selling their products,” said Barbara Mendoza, executive director of the FRESH Project. “Vendors can go to www.thefreshproject.org website and find all necessary forms under the Buy Local tab. We also have two slots available for nonprofits for each week at no fee.”

Fee for vendors is $15 a week or $50 for the season. Forms must be filled out and returned to barbara@thefreshproject.org or mailed to 607 E. Elizabeth St., Shawano, WI 54166.

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