Community

Wed
31
Oct

Compensation offered to widows, vets with ALS

If you are a veteran afflicted with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or the widow of a veteran who died from ALS, you might be eligible for financial compensation.

The Department of Veterans Affairs cites a report from 2006 that reviews the development of ALS, also called Lou Gehrig’s disease, among those who served in the military.

“Veterans are developing ALS in rates higher than the general population, and it was appropriate to take action,” said Dr. James B. Peake, former secretary of veterans affairs.

ALS, a neuromuscular disease that affects about 20,000 people in the United States, is often relentlessly progressive and almost always fatal. The cause is unknown, and available treatments might slow the progression of the disease but do not halt it.

If you know of a veteran who suffers from ALS or a veteran’s widow who passed away from the disease, contact the Shawano County Veterans Service Office at 715-526-9183.

Sat
27
Oct

Creatively loading up the animals

“Once bitten, twice shy.” The thought went through my head the other day when our beef cattle weren’t cooperating. Coordinating our schedules so I can be here to help my husband load up an animal when there’s a sale at the cattle barn is a bit of a challenge, and then sometimes we have to use a little creativity in order to get them where they need to be.

One day, we had the chance to load one up. I was fussing in the house when I got a call. “Open the gate!” Translated: “Come-out-here-I’m-getting-a-round-bale-I-need-help.” We have lovely discussions relaxing in our living room at the end of the day. It’s a give and take, back and forth conversation. Outside, however, he gives instructions with as little words as possible. (I’m the one with the words.)

Sat
27
Oct

The road home has changed over the years

It is a road I traveled many times. As a child, Pa would be driving, and talking about going home. I never quite understood, because I thought his home was the farm we all lived on; but I knew he meant the farm his parents still lived on.

Now, Pa did not grow up on that farm, he grew up in Milwaukee, the oldest of eight children, so when they sold the bakery, where the ghost lived, and moved to the farm by Tichigan, he was already working in Milwaukee, and he stayed there.

Those trips of yesteryear were in older cars with no four-lane highways, and so what now takes three hours took a bit longer then. There was no GPS, so at times we were not on the right road, but as long as we were going in the right direction, Pa did not care.

Once we reached our destination, I knew that there would be hugs from Grandpa and Grandma, plus all the aunts and uncles, and then there would be hours of fun with cousins. Oh, how I loved those times when Pa got to go “home.”

Sat
27
Oct

A blanket statement about how warm quilts are during cold times

I’ve been cleaning closets and dresser drawers. It is amazing what one accumulates. I’m separating items into four categories: garbage, consignment shop, charities and keep.

I found several things I haven’t seen in quite some time. I was delighted to find my colorful knit doll blanket tucked beneath some tablecloths. My grandmother Edna Whittaker made it for me. I believe she gave it to me on my sixth birthday, shortly before she passed away. I thought about the time it took her to make this precious little blanket. I can remember placing my dolls in a buggy and covering them with the blanket. I saved this doll blanket for decades. It will definitely go in the “keep pile.”

Not unlike most of you, I have several memories that involve blankets and quilts. I asked my hubby if he had a favorite blanket or quilt when he was a kid. His response was, “What is the difference between a blanket and a quilt?”

Sat
27
Oct

Shawano to premiere independent film ‘Aquarians’


Contributed Photo “Aquarians” features a number of native Wisconsinites on the silver screen. Melissa Nearman, left, who grew up in Monroe, plays Jennifer, and Eliza Marcus, who resides in Madison, plays Zoe.

A tale of life in the Midwest is coming to a theater near you.

No, really.

“Aquarians,” a film by Michael M. McGuire, has made its way through the film festival circuit and is now preparing for a national release. Like many films, it will premiere in certain cities before going nationwide. Unlike most films, one of the premiere sites is in Shawano.

Shawano Cinema will be one of more than a dozen sites in Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan on Friday where the comedic brotherhood drama will show. McGuire and some of his crew are expected to attend some of the screenings for a question-and-answer session for the opening weekend, but as of press time, the schedule had not been finalized.

Sat
27
Oct

Vendors, volunteers sought for holiday craft fair

The annual Merry Mielke Christmas Art & Craft Fair, sponsored by the Shawano County Arts Council, will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 10 at the Mielke Arts Center, Shawano.

Crafters will display their unique handmade items and help shoppers check items off their gift lists. Holiday bakery, candy and lunch items catered by Clintonville’s Bluebird Cafe will also be available for purchase. Kids can have their pictures taken with Santa and his elves.

Registration for vendors will be accepted until all booths are filled. To sign up for a booth or volunteer to help support the Shawano County Arts Council, contact Cheryl Folkerts at 715-851-5002 or windfall@frontiernet.net, or Sherri Strahl at 715-853-3590 or sherrystrahl@yahoo.com. An online registration form can be found at www.shawanoarts.com.

Wed
24
Oct

Community fills empty bowls for homeless shelter


Leader Photo by Carol Ryczek Volunteers Randy Mallmann and Lois Welch draw names in the bucket drawing for Empty Bowls Caring Hearts on Saturday at Hillcrest Primary School, Shawano. Shawano Area Matthew 25 holds the bowl fundraiser to help pay for the operation of the city’s homeless shelter.

Empty bowls filled an important need at the Shawano Area Matthew 25 Empty Bowls Caring Hearts fundraiser Saturday.

Jen Laude Bisterfeldt, executive director of SAM25, said the annual soup luncheon served more than 300 people and expected to bring in more than $35,000.

Annual operating costs are close to $85,000. Sponsorships, donations and grants help make up the balance, she said.

That money is important as SAM25, a organization that provides shelter for homeless individuals and families, will open its doors for the year Nov. 1.

“We want the community to know that we are here, and we will be open for business starting Nov. 1,” Bisterfeldt said.

At the fundraiser, a donation bought a soup-based lunch and the choice of a hand-made bowl. The event at Hillcrest Primary School also featured drawings and music.

Sat
20
Oct

WPT video game tested locally


Contributed Photo Bonduel Elementary School students serve as the test subjects in the spring for the WPT game “Jo Wilder and the Capitol Case.” The students helped to determine whether there were any bugs and told staff about how much they enjoyed the game.

A new online video game is expected to grab children’s attention and not let them go.

Parents won’t have to worry much, though, as “Jo Wilder and the Capitol Case” is expected to stimulate — not rot — children’s brains and increase their appreciation for Wisconsin history. The game was released earlier this month on Wisconsin Public Television’s education website, WPTeducation.org.

A cohort of teachers and students helped develop the game with WPT Education and Field Day Lab, an educational game developer within the University Wisconsin-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research. Lisa Sorlie, Bonduel School District’s library media specialist, and almost 150 students from Bonduel Elementary School helped test the game.

“Wisconsin Public Television had sent out information to educators who have a specialty in technology,” Sorlie said. “Then there was an application process. They wanted to have representation from all across the state.”

Sat
20
Oct

Frightful! Town tickets trick-or-treating teens

I was appalled at an article I read online about the City of Chesapeake in Virginia. The city has a restriction that does not allow children above the age of 12 to trick or treat. The penalty for breaking the law is a misdemeanor with a fine of not less than $25 nor more than $100 or confinement to jail for not more than six months or both, according to city code. Imagine that, a fine or jail for a kid having fun because someone thinks they are too old.

I have such fond memories of trick or treating as a kid. I lived in Marion and on Halloween, the whole city was filled with kids scurrying about. Most of us went trick or treating through eighth grade. People never made us feel as though we weren’t welcome. In fact, I remember Carrie Halpop inviting us kids in and giving each of us a cookie fresh out of her oven. Rowena Welch made up bags of popcorn and candy corn. Dr. and Mrs. McInnis greeted kids and gave them apples and other healthy treats.

Sat
20
Oct

Clutter makes it difficult to find what is needed

I recently read that “Creative people don’t have a mess, they have ideas laying around everywhere.”

That would be me. Clutter, clutter everywhere, and what I need is not to be found.

My junk drawer is currently in the danger zone. I don’t remember adding anything to it, yet suddenly it seems to be overflowing. I think it seems that way because I am constantly rummaging through it to find what I need.

I fumble through the junk drawer trying to find something like a screwdriver. It may be in plain sight, but not always seen. I suppose I should clean that drawer out, starting with the hundred or so pens that reside there and probably don’t work anymore anyway.

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