Community

Sat
22
Jul

The garden

We’ve had a vegetable garden for as long as I can remember. When my husband and I switched houses with his folks years ago, I looked with dismay at my mother-in-law’s unnervingly large garden, my heart sinking. I remember having a conversation with her, lamenting the fact that I could never keep up with all of that. The dear woman, bless her heart, gave me permission by scoffing away my dismay, “You do what you want!”

Through the years, we’ve had good gardens, and then we’ve had gardens that were nothing more than a haven for weeds. When the kids were small and we were milking cows and keeping up with everything, the garden was basically there to dig out whatever random vegetable that happened to survive.

One winter we had a conversation about switching up the garden area, as our garden, or lack thereof, was seriously starting to bug both of us. “Let’s try a different spot,” my husband suggested. I was up for anything.

Sat
22
Jul

Aunt Gertie hanging in there at 103

July is the month that my Aunt Gertie turns 103 years old. This year, she had to spend it in a rehab center, where she is getting physical therapy to get some of her strength and balance back. She had a problem and needed someone to come and help her up. From there, they took her to the hospital.

Nothing serious was found, but she was unable to return to her apartment until she was stronger. I was unable to travel to southern Wisconsin to visit her on her birthday. However, I got there a week later.

Since the rehab center is in Burlington, I went through some of the area that had been flooded recently. I went past the ball diamond that was completely underwater, and the rivers still seemed very high. A wrong turn took me in an area where garbage was piled by the street. I imagine those homes had flooded basements.

Thu
20
Jul

Embarrass Fun Daze schedule announced

The Embarrass Volunteer Fire Department will host the 29th annual Embarrass Fun Daze on July 29 at the Embarrass Park.

At 11 a.m. there will be a parade starting on the east end of town and proceeding down Main Street to state Highway 22. Cash prizes will be awarded in four categories: most original, most humorous, best commercial, and best club or church organization entry.

Jon Zimdars will be this year’s parade marshal. He was co-owner of Zimdars Hardware, a business his father started, for 37 years. He sold his portion of the business in 2007 but continued to work part time for a number of years. Jon and his wife, Leanne, are now retired.

The events will start with the seventh annual Fun Daze Craft & Flea Market, which will be held next to Zimdar’s Plumbing & Heating, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Most of the events will be held in Fireman’s Park.

A blind man’s volleyball tournament will begin at 9 a.m.

Thu
20
Jul

COLORFUL CONEFLOWERS


Photo by Rob Zimmer Coneflower Marmalade is one of the outrageous, pompom blooming types, in shades of orange with reddish highlights.

Photo by Rob Zimmer Hybrid coneflowers originate from the classic native Purple Coneflower, an excellent plant for butterflies and birds.

Colorful coneflowers are all the rage, and now that midsummer has arrived, these sun loving beauties are in full bloom. In pink, purple, red, yellow, orange, white, green and more, the colors of summer coneflowers are at their peak.

Coneflowers, also known by their botanical name, echinacea, are a favorite among gardeners, especially those with poor soils, and hot, sunny, dry locations.

Hybrids of the classic native purple coneflower, the many newer varieties of colorful summer bloomers are a draw for many gardeners.

Many of the newest varieties are double blooming, or pompom blooming, forming a dense, fluffy cluster of colorful petals at the tip of each stalk. Traditional, daisy-like blooms are still in high demand as these are better for attracting butterflies, songbirds and hummingbirds.

Sat
15
Jul

Native American plays coming to town


Photo by Sabrina Hemken College of Menominee Nation students, from left, Jeffery Rockman, Chris Powless, Angelina Hindsley, Isiah Powless, Sereen Powless and Destiny Ortiz-Nicholas rehearse a scene from “Protectors and Protesters.” The scene is one of two to be presented by the college at several northeast Wisconsin venues later in July.

College of Menominee Nation and the Oneida Community Education Center have spent nearly a decade producing Native American theater productions in Northeastern Wisconsin.

The two entities will embark on their most ambitious collaboration to date from July 25-28 — a show that tours to four tribal communities, including three in Shawano and Menominee counties.

The show will go to CMN’s Keshena campus on July 26, the Mohican Family Center on the Stockbridge-Munsee reservation near Bowler on July 27 and the Siga Funmaker Community Center in the town of Wittenberg on July 28. All shows start at 7 p.m.

The show will open July 25 at the Cultural Heritage Theater on the Oneida Reservation.

Sat
15
Jul

Like father, like son


Photo by Carol Wagner Griffin Bohm recently celebrated becoming an Eagle Scout along with his father, Pat Bohm, who is also an Eagle Scout. They are shown at Shawano Lawn & Stone, which Pat Bohm owns. Griffin is working there this summer.

Griffin Bohm recently celebrated becoming an Eagle Scout, the highest rank in the Boy Scouts. He is the son of Pat Bohm and Okho Bohm-Hagedorn.

“It’s a pretty cool thing,” Griffin said. “I definitely take pride that I attained the highest rank in Scouting.”

The event was even more special because Griffin asked his father to be the guest speaker at the ceremony. Pat and his father, Randy, are also Eagle Scouts.

“It was a neat experience,” said Pat, scoutmaster for Boy Scout Troop 32.

Earning the distinction requires work and fortitude, and Griffin proved his mettle to get there.

“When he started Scouting, I didn’t know if it’s going to last,” Pat said. “He had moments.”

Sat
15
Jul

Shawano emergency doctor finds career rewarding


Contributed Photo Dr. George Vidalakis is an emergency room doctor at ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano.

Dr. George Vidalakis has endured the challenges and victories of emergency medicine for more than three decades. An emergency room physician since 1982, he has served the community of Shawano for 35 years, treating people’s ailments and sometimes making life versus death decisions for them.

Born and raised in Joliet, Illinois, Dr. Vidalakis attended medical school at Southern Illinois University and completed his family residency there. Upon graduation, he pursued a job in family practice but soon discovered his love for the fast pace of rural emergency medicine while moonlighting in the Upper Peninsula and northern Wisconsin emergency departments. He enjoyed the intensity of emergency clinical medicine, relying on his skills and knowledge to do what he believed was right for each patient.

Sat
15
Jul

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner JoAnn Radeske, left, is the president of the Wolf River Master Gardeners, and Pat Gwidt is a member of the board. They are at Radeske’s home on Shawano Lake.

Since 2008, the Wolf River Master Gardeners have added beauty and flavor to Shawano and Menominee counties.

Pat Gwidt, a member of the board, has been a master gardener since 2008 when the group started here. She said there were 19 members then; there are 25 now.

“They can represent Wolf River Master Gardeners at all of the events we sponsor,” Gwidt said.

The gardeners provide education and information on horticulture and environmental stewardship, which supplements the efforts of the University of Wisconsin-Extension program.

“It’s more about knowledge that we share,” President JoAnn Radeske said.

Jamie Patton, UW-Extension agricultural agent for Shawano County, is the adviser for the gardeners and helps them with major decisions.

Sat
15
Jul

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Denise Riley makes the treats for the productions at the Mielke Arts Center. She is holding an pineapple upside-down cupcake that she will be serving during the run of “South Pacific.”

Denise Riley makes the treats for the productions at the Mielke Arts Center, which is presenting “South Pacific” over the next two weeks.

She was born in Janesville. Her family moved to Kendall when she was 6 months old. Riley graduated from Royall High School and pursued a political science major at the University of Wisconsin-Madison until she met her husband of 34 years, Daniel. They lived and worked in Madison for 20 years before moving to Shawano, where they have been for nearly 20 years.

Denise is the food services manager at Lutheran Social Services/Homme Home in Wittenberg, and Daniel works in Appleton for Presto Products. They have two grown children and live in Red River with their Alaskan pointer dog, Tucker.

Q Where do you volunteer?

Sat
15
Jul

Scrubber wipes away doubts after 1st use

A few months ago I saw advertisements for something I was sure I had to have. It was the Hurricane Spin Scrubber.

There were ads on Facebook and on TV. I hesitated to order, as I have been burned in the past making a purchase only to have the merchandise not work as advertised.

First, there was some type of knitting machine that my kids wanted. Following instructions didn’t help in the least, and that knitter did not knit. If knitting was to be done, it was to be done the old-fashioned way, with knitting needles.

Next was a food chopper. It was hand-held, and vegetables and salad were supposed to be easy to chop and prepare for a meal. I can remember it had to be chopped by hand in order to be small enough to fit into the chopper, and instead of chopping the vegetables, it moaned and groaned, leaving a major disappointment.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Community