News

Thu
25
Oct

City will hold onto larger share of room tax revenue

Shawano will hang onto an additional $19,000 from the city’s hotel and motel room tax to fund tourism-related events in the park system, a move the Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce maintains will devastate its own tourism marketing efforts.

“We looked at what we’re trying to do with the parks and events going on in the city, and it makes sense to use some of that room tax for that stuff,” said Mayor Ed Whealon. “That’s what it’s meant to be done with.”

The city has in the past typically retained 5 percent of the room tax, which went into the city’s general fund.

Last year, that came to $4,209 out of the total $84,181 in room taxes collected from six hotels and motels in the city.

The remainder went to the chamber to use for the promotion of tourism in the area, including TV and magazine advertising, publicity, blogs and social media.

Thu
25
Oct

Shawano County approves 2019 budget

Shawano County supervisors Wednesday approved a 2019 budget that should result in property owners seeing their tax rates go down again next year.

The County Board approved a tax levy of $15.8 million, an increase of about $131,000 from this year’s $15.68 million, to support the budget.

That levy will be spread out among taxpayers a little more in 2019 thanks to a 3 percent increase in equalized value, which is rising from $3 million to about $3.1 million.

An increase in new construction of about 1.3 percent, or $194,645, helped boost the county’s equalized value for the second year in a row.

Officials are projecting a tax rate of $5.08 per $1,000 of equalized value, a drop of 11 cents from this year’s rate of $5.19 per $1,000.

This year’s rate was also lower than last year’s $5.29 per $1,000.

County property tax rates vary by municipality, however, because those rates are determined by assessed values and not equalized value.

Thu
25
Oct

Public Record

Shawano Police Department

Oct. 23

Police logged 27 incidents, including the following:

Hit and Run — Police investigated property damage hit-and-run accidents at Waukechon Street and County Road B and in the parking lot at ThedaCare Medical Center, 100 County Road B.

Juvenile — Police responded to a juvenile problem at Shawano Community High School, 220 County Road B.

Assault — A sexual assault complaint was under investigation.

Harassment — Harassment was reported at Shawano Community Middle School, 1050 S. Union St.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Oct. 23

Deputies logged 32 incidents, including the following:

Reckless Driving — Authorities responded to reckless driving complaints on state Highway 47 in the town of Lessor and County Road M in the town of Richmond.

Disturbance — Authorities responded to a disturbance on County Road Y in the town of Belle Plaine.

Wed
24
Oct

City pares back proposed tax rate hike

Shawano taxpayers will see a tax hike in 2019 but not as high as originally expected after some paring back by city officials this week.

The Shawano Finance Committee voted Monday to send to the Common Council a budget for 2019 that calls for an increase in the city’s tax rate of 26 cents per $1,000 of assessed value, rising by about 2.6 percent over this year’s rate of $9.89 per $1,000 to about $10.15 per $1,000.

The increase will mean an additional $26 in taxes on a $100,000 home for the city’s share of taxes.

The total tax rate, when other taxing entities — Shawano County, the school district, the state and technical college — are included, would come to about $24.26 per $1,000 of assessed value, a 2.45 percent increase over this year’s $23.68 per $1,000.

At a finance committee meeting last week, an increase of 45 cents per $1,000 in the city’s tax rate was proposed and was met with objections from several community members who attended.

Wed
24
Oct

Revaluation of commercial properties falls short of expectations

A citywide revaluation of Shawano’s commercial properties that had been expected to provide a revenue boost for the tax base has fallen short of expectations, partly due to blighted properties that have sold at lower than the appraised cost, according to city officials.

“The deterioration factor of a lot of these vacant buildings is starting to catch up with us on the commercial side,” said Assistant City Administrator Eddie Sheppard.

Sheppard cited the vacant property at 153 S. Main St. as an example, which had previously been valued at $100,000 but was sold for $25,000 because of its dilapidated condition.

Also downtown, the former Crescent Theater was sold for about a quarter of the price it was valued at, Sheppard said.

He said the assessor hired by the city, Associated Appraisal of Appleton, used those sales to help determine the value of other downtown properties.

Wed
24
Oct

Final school district budget approved

The Shawano School Board signed off on its final 2018-19 budget Monday, but property owners won’t be seeing quite as much of a drop on their school taxes as anticipated.

The final tax rate will be $9.69 per $1,000 of equalized valuation, just 2 cents below what taxpayers shelled out in 2017-18. An owner of a $100,000 home will pay $969 in taxes to the district.

The district had anticipated a drop of 2.4 percent in the rate to $9.48, anticipating a 1 percent increase in property values. The property values actually increased 6.8 percent, according to a report furnished by Louise Fischer, the district’s business manager.

“That is tremendous news for our district,” Fischer said. “However, because of our TIDs (Tax Increment Districts) in the city of Shawano, that brought the net increase to about 3 percent.”

Wed
24
Oct

Hillcrest classrooms expect to reopen today

The second-grade wing of Hillcrest Primary School in Shawano will be habitable again on Wednesday, more than a week after a fire in a restroom caused heavy smoke damage.

The fire began in a boys’ bathroom stall about 9 a.m. on Oct. 16. Shawano School District Superintendent Gary Cumberland said last week that someone had set fire to the toilet paper rolls, which caused the plastic container holding them to burn and sending smoke and soot into the wing.

“It grew larger than anyone expected,” Cumberland said Monday during the Shawano School Board’s meeting.

The fire was extinguished by school staff, and the Shawano Area Fire Department cleared the building of smoke and made an inspection of the facility.

Wed
24
Oct

Pamperin retires from Premier board of directors

After 40 years of service, Richard Pamperin has announced his retirement from the board of directors of Premier Community Bank.

Pamperin’s banking career began in March 1964 at Production Credit Association in Green Bay, followed by a position with the Federal Intermediate Credit Bank of St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1971, he returned to Wisconsin to accept a position at the Gillett State Bank. In August 1978, he joined the Marion State Bank, now known as Premier Community Bank, where he served as president for 27 years and most recently as chairman of the board.

Wed
24
Oct

Public Record

Shawano Police Department

Oct. 22

Police logged 27 incidents, including the following:

Fire — Authorities responded to a pallet fire at Shawano Concrete, 1050 Rusch Road.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 800 block of East Richmond Street.

Accident — Police responded to a property damage accident on County Road B.

Disorderly — Disorderly conduct was reported at the Wisconsin House, 216 E. Green Bay St.

Oct. 21

Police logged 22 incidents, including the following:

Drug Offense — An 18-year-old Pulaski man was cited for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia at Lakeland Road and Raasch Street.

Auto Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen in the 400 block of South Union Street.

Disturbance — Police responded to a disturbance in the 300 block of Kleeman Court.

Theft — A bike was reported stolen in the 700 block of South Lincoln Street.

Sat
20
Oct

Gresham School showing its age


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Gresham Community School’s high school foods class works on canning apples and preparing other apples to make apple crisps on Friday. This class would move into a different part of the school if the Nov. 6 referendum is successful.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski The ceiling in the lower level of the 1935 portion of Gresham School is crumbling and leaking. With the cost to fix that portion of the building being so high, the school is hoping to build a more modern addition and demolish the oldest part of the school.

Hot and cold classrooms. Deteriorating infrastructure. Limited facilities for career and technical education. Few classrooms that are compliant with the Americans with Disabilties Act.

These are all problems that Gresham School faces with the oldest part of its building, constructed in 1935. It would cost as much to renovate than it would to tear down the old facade and build a new addition that would incorporate modern technology in the classrooms more efficiently.

These are the issues that school officials have been taking to the voters over the last few months in the hopes that they will vote in favor of a $6.5 million referendum on Nov. 6. If successful, property owners would see an increase of about $1.84 per $1,000 of equalized valuation, which would be $184 on a $100,000 home.

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