Opinions

Sat
24
Jun

Effective decision-making can take some practice

“I saw myself sitting in the crotch of this fig tree, starving to death, just because I couldn’t make up my mind which of the figs I would chose. I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.” — Sylvia Plath, “The Bell Jar”

Psychologist William James said, “There is no more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indecision.”

Fear of making the wrong decision is one of the reasons that many people hesitate when faced with a choice. Some people ride the fence when it comes to decision-making, not wanting to be accountable if a decision is wrong.

Sat
24
Jun

Trump exhausting, needs to behave

To the editor:

Exhaustion. That’s what is happening. We are all being hammered with words: traitor, emergency, fake, enemy, lies, ridiculous, terrible.

It is no different than the child in our own family who has exceptional skill and enormous ambition and wants “to get on with things.” They will use the same words. They know they pack a punch.

“Hey, kid, not so fast,” you say. “You are part of a family with rules and commitments to family values. The rules will be obeyed.”

Trump, your rules are “laws of the land” and your commitment is to the Constitution. Just like the kid who is exhausting the parent, you are exhausting your citizens.

Any lawless behavior needs to be curbed.

We cannot cave.

Mary Podzilni,

Town of Wescott

Sat
24
Jun

People don’t yield at trail crosswalks

To the editor:

I’m concerned about a lack of knowledge about the city crosswalks with the Mountain Bay Trail.

People are supposed to yield to pedestrians and bikes at these intersections. By my count, approximately 1 in 50 vehicles actually yields at these crosswalks.

I always wave to thank these people who are in the minority.

John Soderstrom,

Shawano

Sat
17
Jun

Local woman waits for life-saving liver transplant

Have you ever prayed for a phone call? Diana Whealon does, every single day. In October 2015, Diana learned she has bile duct liver cancer, a rare type of cancer.

I wrote an article about Diana last year, and many of you asked for an update. Diana appreciates your concern and prayers. She said, “If only one person becomes a donor as a result of hearing my story, it will be well worth it.”

Going through treatments, hospital stays, setbacks and lack of appetite resulted in Diana losing 70 pounds. She recently shopped for size 4 clothes. Doctors hope she can regain some weight to ready her for the customary 20-pound loss that occurs after a transplant.

Sat
10
Jun

New stone painting activity rocks


Contributed Photo Catalina and Della Vue with a painted rock.

When Amy (Wallrich) Vue and her family visited Amy’s mom in Bullhead City, Arizona, they had no idea they would be bringing home a fun activity that has already engaged more than 300 people.

As Amy’s daughters, Della, 10, and Catalina, 12, were heading to the pool at their hotel, they noticed two colorful rocks.

Amy commented: “It was unusual to see two rocks just lying there. The girls picked one of them up and noticed the words ‘Post to Facebook, Bullhead City Rocks’ written on the back of the rock.

“Later that evening, I found the website. I read about the project and learned the idea is to decorate rocks and hide them in various locations to brighten the day of the lucky person who finds them.

“What is so appealing about this idea is that it can be fun for all ages and abilities. In addition, it doesn’t cost much.”

How the rocks are decorated is a personal choice. You can use colored pencils, acrylics, oil pastels, crayons or chalk.

Sat
03
Jun

Talking shopping

When I was about 11 or 12, my dad gave me money to shop for a gift for my mother’s birthday. There were not many places in Marion to shop. However, Arlette Nehring had a nice little gift store. I knew my mom liked jewelry, primarily earrings and pins. It took me a few visits to the store before I finally selected rhinestone earrings.

A few years later Dad brought me to Shawano to shop for Mom’s gift. I went to Montgomery Wards and selected an electric hand mixer. Mother made the most delicious desserts, stirring everything by hand. I remember her whipping cream with an egg beater and mixing cakes with a wooden spoon. I knew how much she would love the mixer.

Another shopping experience I remember was during my senior year. I was dating my hubby then and our good friends, Ron Kupper and Karen Gould (now Kupper), wanted to have a picnic and go swimming.

Sat
03
Jun

Letter: Closing Dellwood could fund tech lab

To the editor:

A recent school board meeting included an excellent presentation by the math department and showed exactly what they are doing to improve learning for all students. Not only have they added programming to assist students in the actual taking of the tests, major changes such as adding an extra hour of math for students who are not taking the college prep math courses have been made..

Sat
27
May

Memorial Day memories filled with pride, love

Mayors receive numerous invitations to attend and speak at a variety of events. During my 14-year tenure, the event that meant the most to me was the annual Memorial Day program held at Woodlawn Cemetery (weather permitting).

Participating in the Memorial Day parade was emotional and unlike any other parade. My heart swelled with pride as I rode behind the veterans who walked the parade route. Many of them are seniors, but that never seems to stop them from putting on their uniform and making the trek, their shoulders back and head held high.

It was always heartwarming observing the number of people along the parade route showing their support for our Veterans. It is a parade like none other, no laughter, no showy floats, no animals and no frivolity. It is respectful and very surreal. No candy is given out during this patriotic parade.

Sat
20
May

Lessons learned from potential health scare

While showering, I noticed a mole on my midriff had grown larger. I knew that might not be a good sign.

After a very quick shower, it was off to do research on my computer. My first search was non-malignant moles. I learned most moles appear in early childhood and during the first 20 years of a person’s life, although some might appear later. It is normal to have between 10 to 40 moles by adulthood.

It also said most moles are benign. Well, that certainly made me feel better! However, that statement was followed by “if you notice changes in a mole’s color, height, size or shape, you should see a doctor.”

I looked at pictures of non-malignant moles. Some looked similar to mine; that was good to see.

The next search, malignant moles. The site talked about the ABCDEs that are important signs a mole could be cancerous. It further stated if a mole displayed any of these signs to have it checked immediately:

Sat
20
May

Letter: Extend kind words to those who protect us

To the editor:

Much has changed in policing since 1962 when President John F. Kennedy set aside May 15 as National Peace Officers Day and the week in which it falls as a time to recognize America’s peacekeepers, but the dedication and self-sacrificing nature of the men and women who commit themselves to the profession has been ever present.

Some may view policing as just one of many career options, but in reality, if you ask most law enforcement professionals you’d likely learn many regard it as a calling.

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