Opinions

Sat
02
Jun

Animals care about people, so people should care about them

I heard, once again, about a dog that was left in a car when it was 90 outside. Some people still believe it’s OK to leave a dog in a car on a hot day if the windows are left open or they are parked in the shade. The truth is, it is still very dangerous for a dog.

It is said that, on a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can reach 100 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 109 degrees in less than 10 minutes.

Animals can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in a short period of time.

When walking your dog, remember, if the air temperature is 87 degrees, the asphalt temperature can reach 140 degrees, hot enough to cause burns, permanent damage and scarring after just one minute of contact. Hot sidewalks, pavement and parking lots can not only burn paws, they also reflect heat onto dogs’ bodies, increasing their risk of heatstroke.

Sat
26
May

GOP election plans put democracy in danger

To the editor:

A democracy is in danger of extinction when its citizens find it difficult to vote. If we want our democracy to survive, we need to make it easier to vote.

Wisconsin has previously been a progressive state that encouraged people to vote through its expansion of voting options. We have allowed same-day voter registration. We have given working individuals extra days to register to vote right up to the Friday before an election. College students could vote in the towns where they were living as they pursued their education. All that could change if the Republicans in the Legislature have their way.

Sat
26
May

Clintonville mayor wants veterans honored

To the editor:

On Monday, May 28, the nation will observe Memorial Day to remember and honor those who have served our country in uniform and are no longer with us. Since 1868, this has been a day designated to remember them and to decorate their graves with flowers. I hope you will be a part of these important ceremonies.

There will be a short parade down Main Street, but that is not the important part. I urge you to be present in the cemetery for the full ceremony to hear the keynote speaker, to learn the names of those who have fallen since last year and to hear the music, the rifle salute and the mournful notes of taps.

Those who served gave the best years of their young lives to protect our freedoms, and many lost their lives while doing so.

The ceremony in Clintonville Graceland Cemetery will begin at 10 a.m. and will last about 45 minutes.

Certainly, we can take that little portion of our lives to honor them and do the cookout later.

Sat
26
May

Bullying should not be tolerated

To the editor:

The older I get, the more I realize the awful things that are happening. What is this bullying all about?

You know, if the shoe was on the other foot, you wouldn’t like it. Time to make friends with all of the people. Remember, God created all of us, and that means all colors. We all have hearts and souls, so come on. Get real.

Parents, you should be behind this and everyone that’s trying to help.

Sally Raddant,

Shawano

Sat
19
May

MS no longer something to be ashamed of

Amanda, my grandson Jeff’s wife, is a beautiful dark-haired, dark-eyed, devoted wife and mother of four. Her smile lights up a room. If you met this vibrant woman, you would never know she is living with a progressive autoimmune disorder, a disease that affects 2.5 million people around the world.

Amanda recalled: “I can remember looking over at my husband and mother and seeing their faces as the doctor gave me the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. It was March 2009, one month after our wedding. We had three small children and our world was about to change.”

Amanda explained: “The first sign I had that something was wrong was when I began to lose vision in my right eye. I put off seeing a doctor, hoping my sight would improve, but my vision worsened and I knew I needed to have it checked out.”

Sat
05
May

Honor corrections employees in coming week

To the editor:

During the week of May 6, we take the time to recognize and applaud the dedication, self-sacrifice, professionalism and hard work corrections employees commit to, reliably every day 24/7. Corrections Employee Week was created by a proclamation from President Ronald Reagan on May 5, 1984.

The role of correctional employees is ever changing. Recent trends of drug dependency and opioid abuse have ravaged even our small community of Shawano. Mental health and drug dependent inmates make a jail, difficult and at times a dangerous place to work. Our staff responds tirelessly to protect each other, protect inmates and above all protect the public. Separating those who wish to do harm from the rest of the public is a task most have not had, or needed to experience.

Sat
05
May

Highway department kept roads clear

To the editor:

Our recent historic 33-inch snowstorm was one that I’ll not soon forget.

Those of us in Menominee County should be, and are, very appreciative of the efforts put forth by our highway department in keeping our roads open.

While the snow on my driveway prevented me from getting to the road, it was very reassuring that, had I been able to, I could have driven someplace.

Thank you for your hard work.

Steve Zaleski,

Keshena

Sat
05
May

Thanks for all the help during snowstorm

To the editor:

To all the snow plowers in the county and city and law officers, you did a great job on keeping our roads clear of snow and ice during the big snowstorm, risking their lives to help all the citizens of the county and city be safe.

I think the snow plowers did a great, great job for 24 hours a day. I thank you all.

Then neighbors helped neighbors get shoveled out. I had four different people who helped me to get plowed out and shoveled out, so thank you for helping me.

Duaine Gast,

Shawano

Sat
05
May

Gun killings perpetrated by people

To the editor:

I was going for a ride, and I was talking about all the gun killings. I was reminded, it’s not the guns, but the people who have the guns. It’s the people that are the killers, and they are using the guns to do it — and I might say, the wrong way.

Just remember the soldiers and the police officers. These people know what they are doing and when to use them. It’s sad that guns get in the wrong hands and people don’t use them correctly.

Please stop and think about others and not yourself. Something’s got to be done about our laws.

Sally Raddant,

Shawano

Sat
05
May

Older generation embraces change, even if you don’t see it

King Whitney Jr. said, “Change has a considerable psychological impact on the human mind. To the fearful it is threatening because it means that things may get worse. To the hopeful, it is encouraging because things may get better. To the confident it is inspiring because the challenge exists to make things better.”

I recently overheard some individuals comment that older people are set in their ways and are negative toward change. I doubt if the younger generation really understands the changes that older people have gone through and embraced over the years.

For example, folks of my generation have gone from a wall phone with a party line to cellphones/smart phones. When you are out and about, take a notice of how many older people are using them. It’s surprising.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Opinions