Opinions

Sat
02
Dec

Sometimes things don’t go as planned

I knew I was having a bad day when I overslept, and my body was resisting picking up the pace.

Somehow, all the plans I had made for the day were being remade in my mind. Then, when I was about ready to sit down to breakfast, I remembered a project that I was going to do and drop off while I was in Shawano.

I have a small copier to print stuff from the computer, but it also copies sheets of paper when I need to make copies of something. It is a simple contraption that works excellent, unless there is operator error, which there was.

If I don’t do it right, I have to do it over, I thought. So I did it over, and then it stopped printing mid-page, and the change ink cartridge warning beeped. I have had this printer for several years, and it normally starts printing lighter and lighter, or doesn’t print everything, and then I know it is time for new. However, if it wants to quit mid page, we will change the ink cartridge.

Sat
25
Nov

County needs to send message on voting districts

To the editor:

On Nov. 14, I appeared before the Shawano County Board to urge them to consider a resolution that asks the state Legislature to create a nonpartisan redistricting process for drawing Wisconsin’s state and congressional voting maps.

Every 10 years after the U.S. Census, states are required to redraw our voting districts with the new census data. Under our current system, the political party in the majority draws the maps. This is a clear conflict of interest.

Politicians combine census data with voter information to draw districts that favor their party. Now there are software advances that allow gerrymandering with shocking precision. Before the GOP redrew Wisconsin’s district maps in 2011, Democrats held 52 seats in the Assembly after winning 57 percent of the vote. Four years later, Democrats won 52 percent of the Wisconsin Assembly votes but held only 39 seats.

Sat
25
Nov

Never a better time to adopt a cat

The Shawano County Humane Society’s mission is to improve and save the lives of domestic animals through compassionate care, community engagement and advocacy for animals.

This year the shelter has received a very large influx of cats/kittens. Normally, there are two times a year litters are born; this year, due to the mild weather, there were three. Right now, the shelter has more cats/kittens than any time in the past.

Due to the number of felines currently in the shelter, the society has an ambitious goal. They would like to find a loving home for as many of them as possible. The shelter is full and room is needed for animals that come in on a daily/weekly basis.

Sat
25
Nov

BOOKS & STUFF

As you might know, we held Erika’s memorial service on Nov. 14. We wanted it to be a celebration of who Erika was. What a tribute to our beautiful daughter to have so many take time from their busy lives to attend her memorial. We have no way to properly thank everyone, but we do want to mention the wonderful care we received from Schmidt & Schulta Funeral Home, Pastor Wes Jedras and Pastor Les Munnik. The meal and service at Chet & Emil’s was perfect! I’m proud to be surrounded by such a caring community. Thank you, all.

This wasn’t much of a week for reading, but I did squeeze in a very short e-book. “Two Tocks Before Midnight” by Clay Boutwell was listed as something that could be read in two sessions, but it only took a couple of hours.

Sat
25
Nov

Thanksgiving done, now shifting to Christmas

By now, your turkey is probably gone, either eaten, or packed away in the freezer. I got a small bird this year. With hunting and plans with other families, it is always hard to know just how big of one I need, but also had some ham available, just in case that small size bird wasn’t enough.

For me, I dread making the turkey. First, it needs several days to thaw in the refrigerator, which takes up a lot of room. Next, you have to take that plastic wrapper off, plus rinse the thing and pull out all the goodies inside, like a neck, gizzard, heart and liver.

That is normally done in the wee hours of the morning, because a big bird needs to get in the oven fairly early in order for it to get fully cooked. This smaller version didn’t need to be in quite as early.

Sat
18
Nov

Church basement women an interesting bunch

Who are church basement women, and what exactly do they do? There was a book written many years ago that was all about these women. It had recipes and poems, and took a humorous look at them and the church basements, which were their domain. Their main thing was making funeral lunches, and sometimes even wedding meals.

Eventually, the book was adopted into a play that toured in the Midwest. I saw it in the Minneapolis area, and then went back again to see “Church Basement Women, a Second Helping.” It was funny, as I saw glimpses of my own ladies group at my church as being much like the play. After all, humor is only funny if it has an element of reality.

Sat
18
Nov

Think about the food before you donate

It’s the season of giving and thanksgiving, and many of us will be asked to donate to food drives to help support families in our communities. We might turn to our pantry and grab something to donate without giving it much thought, such as a box of noodles or a can of soup. While these choices play an important role in stocking the shelves at local food pantries, we should remember that patrons at food pantries — our very own friends and neighbors — reflect many of the same health and nutritional concerns that our own families experience.

Conditions such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity coupled with a person’s simple desire to feel well mean we should watch the preservatives, sodium content, added sugar and overall nutritional value in the food we donate.

Sat
18
Nov

ThedaCare acknowledges its role in rural areas

Dear Editor:

ThedaCare health clinics and hospitals play a vital role in the rural communities they serve, providing high-quality care close to home for area residents. We look forward to joining with the Wisconsin State Office of Rural Health to celebrate National Rural Health Day on Thursday to draw attention to the unique health needs of rural areas and the efforts we take to address them.

Approximately 1.5 million people — or one in four Wisconsin residents — live in rural communities across the state. The small towns and rural areas served by ThedaCare are the heart of our state. The hospitals and clinics serving these areas keep communities strong and healthy by not only providing high-quality heath care, but also providing good jobs.

Sat
18
Nov

This Thanksgiving, keep your family close

Some time ago, I read a Thanksgiving story about a blind boy who sat on the steps of a building with a hat at his feet. He held a sign that said: “I am blind, please help.”

There were only a few coins in the hat.

A man walked by and dropped a couple coins in the hat and he then took the boy’s sign, turned it around, and wrote something on it. He gave the boy his sign back and walked away.

People passing by started dropping coins into the hat and the hat filled up. The man returned to see how things were going. The boy recognized his footsteps and asked, “Were you the one who changed my sign this morning? What did you write?”

The man replied, “I said what you said, but in a different way.” I wrote: “Today is a beautiful day but I cannot see it.”

Both signs told people the boy was blind. But the first sign simply said he was blind. The second sign reminded people how lucky they were for being able to see the beautiful day.

Sat
11
Nov

Home remedies help to cure what ails you

I grew up in the late 1940s and 50s. In those days, you had to be mighty sick to go to the doctor’s office or hospital. There was one time when I was very sick with the chicken pox, and the doctor came to our house. Other than that, I don’t ever remember seeing a doctor during my childhood.

Nurses came to school to give us our shots. Remember those pills that were supposed to prevent a goiter? I always thought a goiter couldn’t be as bad as those pills were.

While growing up, my parents took care of me if I was under the weather or hurt. When I had a cold/congestion, my mother filled a teakettle with water and added some Vicks. She would wrap me in a warm blanket and I would sit next to our kerosene stove. She told me to inhale the fumes to help me breathe better. She also rubbed Vicks on my feet and put my dad’s wool deer hunting socks on me.

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