Opinions

Sat
14
Oct

Words of wisdom have interesting stories behind them

Recently, my son, Dan, and I talked about his plans for deer hunting. Dan lives in Neenah, and he hunts in Wescott’s mooseyard. When his grandpa, Clarence Marquardt, was living, he routinely hunted with him in the Wittenberg area.

While in his 80s, Grandpa still enjoyed sitting in the hunting shack with Dan. It was their time, a special time for both of them. Dan enjoyed listening to grandpa’s stories and sayings. He still laughs when he thinks about some of them. I guess “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.”

On the way out to the woods, Grandpa would say, “Daniel, it’s still darker than a black bear’s butt this morning.” When they went into the hunting shack, he’d grumble, “It’s colder than an Eskimo’s outhouse in here.”

Once, Dan commented he would have brought a rope “if” he had thought of it. Grandpa replied, “And if the dog hadn’t stopped to raise his leg, he would have caught the rabbit.”

Sat
07
Oct

Clothesline conversations bring people together


Contributed Photo Lorna Marquardt’s cousins, Elaine (Buettner) Knope and her sister, Carol, hang out doll clothes on wash day in this photo taken in the early 1950s.

I’m pleased that in addition to The Shawano Leader, my column will be published in the Oconto County Times Herald, Wittenberg Enterprise & Birnamwood News, Super Shopper and Your Community Shopper.

I’d like to take this time to say “welcome” and “thank you for allowing me into your home.”

I began writing articles while serving as Shawano’s mayor, focusing on city issues. Since my retirement, I have been writing about people, memories from the past, nonprofit groups, businesses and area happenings.

Readers often tell me they enjoy the trivia questions. You can find the answer to today’s question on another page in this issue.

I hope you like my new name for the column, “Clothesline Conversation.”

I grew up in the 1950s and ’60s. Everyone had a wash machine, but a dryer was a luxury. Statistics show 90 percent of the families in the ’50s didn’t have a dryer, but nearly every family had a clothesline.

Sat
30
Sep

From walking to running to half marathons


Contributed Photo Robyn Shingler strikes a pose at the 2016 Madison Half Marathon. Shingler started walking for exercise at age 52, then started running and now is preparing for her second half marathon.

Contributed Photo Robyn Shingler shows off the awards she won at the Biggest Loser Run/Walk in Eau Claire in 2015.

Dedicated. Determined. Disciplined. Those are just a few words that describe local runner/athlete Robyn Shingler.

Not unlike most running enthusiasts, Robyn started out by walking.

She commented: “I was motivated to walk two years ago, when on a lark for my 52nd birthday, I deactivated all social media and set a goal to accomplish a few things with my time off the grid.”

Robyn used her free time in a variety of ways. She sang at two events, wrote several letters, read four classics and walked 100 miles in 52 days.

Robyn remarked: “The amount of free time I had and what I was able to accomplish was incredible! I felt I really reconnected to what is important — relationships, health and my faith.”

Sat
23
Sep

Humane society could use your help

I recently joined the Shawano County Humane Society board. People have said to me, “Lorna, how can you stand to go out there? It is such a sad place. If I would go out there, I would want to bring all those animals home. It’s so depressing and sad.”

I explained, I don’t see it that way. I am happy for the animals that they have a warm place to stay. They are fed, watered and safe. Although the animals are well cared, what they do need is some love and exercise. The Humane Society staff is kept busy feeding, watering and cleaning. They have little time left to give attention to these precious animals. We are so grateful for volunteers, but we need more!

The purpose of today’s article is to ask you readers if you might have an hour or two a week to spend petting or walking these animals (who would be so grateful) as they wait for their forever home.

Sat
16
Sep

Nanny V has more children’s books on the way


Contributed Photo Vicki (Lamberies) Wartman writes under the pen name Nanny V. She has published two books and has plans for more, including Christian books for children.

Her pen name is Nanny V, but most of you know her as Vicki (Lamberies) Wartman.

Vicki was raised in Gresham, where her parents owned and operated the Woodland for decades. Many of you probably remember the Woodland II that Vicki ran successfully for several years here in Shawano.

Vicki is a self-motivated individual who puts her heart into her work. She was a Realtor for Hilgenberg Realty for about 20 years. While working there, Vicki’s mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

Vicki commented: “I always promised my mother if I could care for her, I would never send her to a nursing home. My husband, John, was kind enough to allow me to bring both my mother and my stepfather into our home to live with us.”

Vicki continued: “My stepfather was a veteran, and he had some physical disabilities and later suffered from dementia. I retired from the real estate business because my family needed me. They lived with us for 12 years before they passed away.”

Sat
16
Sep

Letter: Alderman explains views on finance position

To the editor:

I am writing this letter to address a few inaccurate comments that were made in a recent article. I also want the residents I represent to know how I represented them during the hiring process of the finance director.

We did receive applications from applicants who I believe would have accepted the position within the original salary range of $75,000-$85,000. Three of the candidates interviewed actually live in the greater Shawano area; two of whom graduated locally.

It is often mentioned, “how do we get our graduates to return to Shawano?” This was a perfect opportunity, and I believe the candidates were qualified.

Upon learning of the hiring/salary of the new hire, finance manager Nancy Schauer, who worked for SMU for 30-plus years, tendered her resignation with an effective date of Oct. 6.

Sat
16
Sep

Letter: Health care forum sparks concerns

To the editor:

There was a lively health care discussion at the Shawano Civic Center on Aug. 28. Three area doctors conducted a forum for over 30 participants. The providers shared how the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has affected their practices and how possible changes made by Republicans in Congress could affect health care in the United States. The discussion challenged ideas recently proposed in the attempt to pass a Trumpcare plan.

The doctors all agreed that the Affordable Care Act had made an impact on their patients.

Those who have health problems now go to the doctor for help rather than waiting as they had in the past and going to the emergency room when their health problems became acute. A concern was for the possibility that those with pre-existing conditions could be charged astronomical health insurance premiums if the ACA were to be replaced.

Sat
09
Sep

Recognizing stress 1st step toward relieving it

We have all heard someone say, “I am really feeling stressed out today.” Everyone feels stressed sometimes. Some people cope with stress better than others. Some recover quickly while others have difficulty getting past whatever has caused them stress.

Stress is how the brain and the body respond to demands. Every type of demand or stressor, such as exercise, work, diet, school, major life changes or traumatic events, can be stressful. A stressor may be a one-time or short-term occurrence, or it can be something that keeps happening over a long period of time.

Stress can be brought about by changes such as a loss of job, a divorce, a death, an accident or an illness. Routine stress can also be related to pressures of family, work, school or other daily responsibilities.

Financial stress is not uncommon. Growing tensions in our world, politics, increased violence, lack of respect for others, and environmental concerns can be stressors.

Sat
02
Sep

Here’s a primer on illicit drug use

When I attended high school, a few of my classmates smoked cigarettes. Sometimes, I heard there had been a beer party in a woods or gravel pit. I never heard anything about illegal drugs. Maybe I was just oblivious to it, but I knew nothing about drugs during my teen years.

In fact, I am still pretty naïve when it comes to drugs. However, I know it is a growing problem not just here, but also nationwide.

Wanting to write a story, but with limited knowledge about the subject, I asked our local law enforcement agencies for some information I could share with you readers. It certainly was eye-opening to me, and it may be to you as well.

I learned most of the common drugs have street names so they can be referred to during normal conversations without raising suspicions.

Sat
02
Sep

Letter: Presidents should live up to our highest standards

To the editor:

“Oh beautiful for heroes proved/ In liberating strife/ Who more than self, our country loved/ And mercy more than life./ America! America! God shed his grace on thee,/ And crown thy good with brotherhood/ From sea to shining sea.”

These beautiful words and lilting melody have the power to bring tears to the eyes of proud Americans across the land and political spectrum. America has always been great because of the selfless sacrifices of countless nameless Americans. America has always been a shining beacon of hope to a world awash in strife.

With increasing distress, Americans have watched the astoundingly rapid deterioration of many principles we hold dear. Dignity and civil behavior at the presidential level has in the past set our moral tone. Judicial judgments were respected and supported, and loyalty to the president was not a test of innocence.

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