Opinions

Sat
09
Mar

Voting chance for the people to make a difference

Our right to vote is precious.

It wasn’t until 150 years ago that the right to vote got some government protections. The 15th Amendment to the Constitution stated that “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged because of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Women fought for the right to vote for decades, but it wasn’t until 1920 that the 19th Amendment was passed. In 1971 the death of thousands of young adults in Vietnam led to the passage of the 26th Amendment. Voting was thus expanded to include those who were at least 18 years of age

Sat
09
Mar

Socialism embraced by too many on the Left

During the 2016 presidential campaign, many scoffed at Bernie Sanders and his call for socialism. Today, Democrats announcing their candidacy for president shout Sanders’ 2016 ideas as mainstream. Do you wonder why that is? Does that bother you?

Did you know that socialism was tried in America, and the people starved?

The Pilgrims came to America for religious freedom and were financed by wealthy merchants in England. The English merchants had the Pilgrims sign a document that placed them into a communal agreement. The Plymouth Colony was communally owned and cultivated. This caused dissension because the lazy got the same as the hardworking (From each according to his ability, to each according to his need). In 1623, the Pilgrims faced famine because of this socialist commune.

Sat
02
Mar

McCarthy latest example of forgetting it’s just a game

Apparently, Mike McCarthy’s fall from grace has turned into a death spiral. Without a job to worry about, the ex-head coach of the Green Bay Packers doesn’t seem as worried about public optics as he decided to go ballistic against a referee for a bad call.

Sure, you can point out that he got hot with some of the refs when the Packers were playing. However, this incident was at a high school basketball game in Pulaski, and he wasn’t even the coach. He was in the stands, and his stepson was a player for the opposing team.

Sat
23
Feb

Jussie Smollett’s ‘victim’ tale makes victims of us all

When “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett said he was the victim of a vicious hate crime in January, the world felt horrible for him, with U.S. senators and other public officials vowing to take action to strengthen hate crimes laws.

When Smollett was arrested for filing a false police report this week, that horror turned to anger, as the story of an attempted racist attack is now supposedly a hoax, making it so much harder for people of color and gay people to come forward about hate crimes, victimizing hardcore fans of President Donald Trump, and serving as another reminder that some celebrities use their spotlight to cover up their own shortcomings.

Sat
16
Feb

Not wagging tail yet over dog park talk

Last week, news broke about a potential dog park being planned in Shawano near the Shawano County Humane Society. As a dog owner, I should have found that to be wonderful news. I didn’t, because I’ve seen other efforts to establish a dog park in the area fizzle out for one reason or another.

When I first moved to Wisconsin and started working for the Leader eight years ago, there was talk about the city potentially offering some land that it owned near County Road B for a potential park. That didn’t materialize.

Then a dog park group formed, and Shawano County was approached for potential space for a park. Several ideas were tossed up, including the old county farm property, the old Franklin School site and later a clay borrows site in the town of Belle Plaine. Then a circus ensued.

Sat
16
Feb

America needs better health care system

The private insurance market has had a strong hold on American’s health care for decades.

Americans have had to deal with high deductibles, co-pays and no maximum caps in their insurance plans. Patients who suffered from pre-existing conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and other life-threatening conditions have been denied coverage.

Back in 2008, when the costs for health care insurance were skyrocketing, the Democrats in Congress felt the need to help those who couldn’t get the health care they so desperately needed. Although they thought the best solution was a government single payer tax-funded plan, they compromised and settled for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which kept private insurance companies in the loop.

Sat
16
Feb

Military on border OK in certain instances

Is it legal for the military to be on the border? Has the military ever been on the border before? Is our National Security at risk? Can we use active duty, reserve and National Guard military?

The legal discussion for use of the military has been debated since our beginnings. In the early years of the United States, there were incidents involving use of the military by the U.S. government. In 1807, we had the Insurrection Act, designed to quell rebellions. Following the Civil War, abuses by occupying federal troops and carpet baggers in the South resulted in the law known as the Posse Comitatus Act.

The purpose and intent of these two laws is to limit the use of federal military troops to enforce domestic policies within the United States. To be clear these laws are aimed at the use of active military except for the Coast Guard, which operates under Homeland Security.

Sat
16
Feb

Enough politics, let’s cut taxes for families

I made a promise to you and the people of our state when I was running for governor: I promised I would cut taxes by 10 percent for middle-class families.

So, just last week, I set out to make good on that promise, introducing my plan to cut taxes for Wisconsin’s working families by 10 percent. If you’re a single filer make less than $80,000 or your family makes less than $125,000, you’ll get a full 10 percent tax cut on your taxes next year. If you’re a single filer making less than $100,000 or your family makes less than $150,000, you’ll still see a tax cut on your taxes next year, too.

As I’ve said all along, I don’t make promises I can’t keep, and I won’t propose things we can’t pay for.

So, I didn’t just promise to cut taxes by 10 percent. I promised you that I’d cut taxes for middle-class families — and that I’d do it responsibly — by making sure we have a plan to pay for it in the long run.

Sat
16
Feb

Living in small town means paying it forward

To the editor:

Two recent experiences focused my attention on the benefits of living in a small town where people look out for each other.

Most recently in the storm Sunday night, I got stuck in my cousin’s driveway on a rural road just outside of town. When three of us could not push out the four-wheel drive vehicle (I went off the driveway into the ditch), I hailed a plow driver who was clearing the parking lot of a nearby business. He came to our rescue. One more pusher did not help, so he and his two 6-year-old sons and another helper shoveled so they could hook on and pull my car out. He also assisted a friend who was stuck in the other side of the driveway.

Sat
16
Feb

Manufacturing tax credit needs rethinking

It’s time for Wisconsin to rethink the runaway tax break that allows manufacturers and other businesses to pay next to nothing in income taxes. Gov. Tony Evers wants to rein in this wasteful tax break and redirect the benefits to the middle class, but Republican lawmakers are fighting tooth and nail to keep the loophole.

The Manufacturing and Agriculture Credit, which lawmakers passed in 2011, nearly eliminates income taxes for manufacturers and agricultural producers — at a very steep price. This tax loophole has cost an estimated $1.4 billion in lost tax revenues so far, reducing the resources available for investing in Wisconsin’s families, schools, and communities.

Indeed, the Wisconsin Budget Project, the nonprofit organization for which I work, calculated that tax break is costing nearly double the amount originally estimated.

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