Opinions

Sat
18
Nov

This Thanksgiving, keep your family close

Some time ago, I read a Thanksgiving story about a blind boy who sat on the steps of a building with a hat at his feet. He held a sign that said: “I am blind, please help.”

There were only a few coins in the hat.

A man walked by and dropped a couple coins in the hat and he then took the boy’s sign, turned it around, and wrote something on it. He gave the boy his sign back and walked away.

People passing by started dropping coins into the hat and the hat filled up. The man returned to see how things were going. The boy recognized his footsteps and asked, “Were you the one who changed my sign this morning? What did you write?”

The man replied, “I said what you said, but in a different way.” I wrote: “Today is a beautiful day but I cannot see it.”

Both signs told people the boy was blind. But the first sign simply said he was blind. The second sign reminded people how lucky they were for being able to see the beautiful day.

Sat
11
Nov

Home remedies help to cure what ails you

I grew up in the late 1940s and 50s. In those days, you had to be mighty sick to go to the doctor’s office or hospital. There was one time when I was very sick with the chicken pox, and the doctor came to our house. Other than that, I don’t ever remember seeing a doctor during my childhood.

Nurses came to school to give us our shots. Remember those pills that were supposed to prevent a goiter? I always thought a goiter couldn’t be as bad as those pills were.

While growing up, my parents took care of me if I was under the weather or hurt. When I had a cold/congestion, my mother filled a teakettle with water and added some Vicks. She would wrap me in a warm blanket and I would sit next to our kerosene stove. She told me to inhale the fumes to help me breathe better. She also rubbed Vicks on my feet and put my dad’s wool deer hunting socks on me.

Sat
11
Nov

Alderman will vote no on city budget

To the editor:

As an alderperson for the past 15 years, I have served on most of the committees/commissions. I currently serve on the Shawano Municipal Utilities commission. I also serve on the city finance committee with Sandy Steinke and Rhonda Strebel. Mayor Jeanne Cronce is ad hoc member.

Putting together an annual budget is time and labor intensive. Elected officials meet with the city administrator, department heads and staff to review the draft budgets and concerns. Many meetings follow.

As the numbers started coming together, I was very thankful to both the Shawano school board and the county board members for adopting budgets with decreased taxes. I would also like to thank Sheriff Adam Bieber for withdrawing the request for monetary assistance from the city for the evidence center for the 2018 budget.

Sat
11
Nov

Cut costs instead of implementing taxes

To the editor:

It has come to my attention that some members of our local governments are floating the possibility of a wheel tax to offset shortfalls caused by excessive health care costs and other expenses for the “top tier” plans some of the local government employees have. What I mean by top tier plans are those with only $500 “out of pocket” costs as opposed to most private plans the general public have, which have $5,000 “out of pocket” costs!

Sound familiar? When costs for government exceed the dollars brought in by taxes, the first thing to happen is “raise taxes” instead of looking for ways to cut costs.

Maybe we should institute a “benefits tax” on people who get greater benefits than their counterparts in the private sector? Please call your local representative if you think another “tax” is not in our best interest.

Just want you to know what may be coming.

Bruce Watters

Bowler

Sat
11
Nov

Bystanders detriment to democracy

To the editor:

Jeff Flake’s speech on the Senate floor reminds us that, in a democracy, there can be no bystanders. He is stepping down rather than ignoring the distress that our country is feeling because of Trump’s careless leadership.

Trump’s latest statement suggested a wish for the judicial system to be hijacked so as to conduct political prosecutions. Speaking to the disruptions in his campaign rallies, Trump said “in the good old days” we could take matters into our own hands.

Sat
11
Nov

‘Les Miserables’ raised bar for Clintonville High

To the editor:

How nice to see such a big audience for the Clintonville High School musical production last weekend. I probably was one of a few who had not seen the musical or the movie “Les Miserables.” That made it even more enjoyable to see the characters come to life. The book was required reading when I went to CHS, and one cast family member told me she had to read it in French.

This production certainly raised the bar for high school productions. The large cast showed a growing interest in theater at the school. I personally was thrilled to watch one performer who started out at the first children’s theater workshop at the Mielke Arts Center. Wow, what a lot of talent and experience can do over a relatively short time. It’s a long way from singing “I want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” to “I Dreamed a Dream” in Les Miz.

Sat
11
Nov

‘Thank you for your service’ least we can say to veterans

This is the week we celebrate Veterans Day. We honor our veterans and often say, “Thank you for your service.” Have we said it? Do we know why?

Recently, a movie came out with that very title. It is based on a true story of Staff Sgt. Adam Schumann from North Dakota, who was deployed to Iraq three times, the last in 2007. After Schumann’s service, his battle was back in the United States with post-traumatic stress disorder.

When Schumann was newly interviewed, he referred to the phrase “Thank you for your service” without criticism but posed the question of what the phrase means. This has had my mind wandering. What does the phrase mean, and what does that mean for those of us who have not served?

Here are some statistics provided by several resources — The Watson Institute, Brown University and Wikipedia’s United States military casualties of war — of which citizens might not be aware.

Sat
04
Nov

Letters to the Editor

To the Editor:

Orphan Grain Train has been receiving requests from Texas and Florida for tools and building materials for rebuilding homes. OGT purchased $40,000 worth of drywall, five truckloads of which were shipped to the Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Houston for reconstruction of homes.

OGT expects to be in Texas at least two years providing aid and relief for the victims. On Oct. 30, OGT will be sending two of their bedroom units — each one sleeps approximately 18 to 20 volunteers — to the Gloria Dei facility for meals and showers. OGT is also sending volunteer villages to Fort Myers so the relief workers have a place to sleep, eat, shower and store their tools and supplies.

Locally, OGT has been collecting new or slightly used clothing and miscellaneous items that we will ship to our distribution center in Westfield.

Sat
04
Nov

Lorge traveling the world to provide good plumbing

Humanitarians believe in the value of human life, and they do what they can to save/improve human lives or to alleviate suffering.

We have all heard of famous humanitarians to include Mother Teresa, Martin Luther King Jr., Mahatma Gandhi, Princess Diana, Angelina Jolie, Oprah Winfrey and Bill Gates, to name a few.

We have local people who also fit the description of humanitarian, but their good works often go unnoticed/unrecognized, and that’s OK with them. They don’t help others for the recognition.

Such is the case with Randy Lorge, instructor of plumbing apprenticeship at Fox Valley Technical College.

Randy told me, “To have the opportunity to change lives and even save lives, by doing what I do, is one of the greatest blessings God has ever given me.”

Sat
28
Oct

Letter: CAFO settlement is harmful to residents

To the editor:

Your Oct. 20 headline “DNR settles suit of large farm rules” was a disappointment. The article went on to explain the DNR “cannot make up the rules as they go along” and was very misleading.

The DNR agency has constraints with staffing, funding and support from our politicians. We all know, it’s who you know and how much you have that govern our laws in this country.

The Dairy Business Association has many lobbyists and is a daily presence in our Capitol. This article stated Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations can utilize animal run-off through a vegetation patch to filter pollution from their calf barns. It does not explain that this particular practice affected a field that abuts a natural wetland and river. The river is now contaminated with E. coli. The DNR was contacted by a resident about concerns of contamination of the river. The DNR stepped in and cited the CAFO to correct problems.

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