Opinions

Sat
31
Mar

Which side of history will representatives be on?

To the editor:

Recently I sent the following email to Rep. Mike Gallagher, Sen. Ron Johnson, State Rep. Gary Tauchen and State Sen. Robert Cowles.

“I hoped you watched some of the coverage on the marches all over the nation on Saturday. I read an opinion piece in the Boston Globe that highlighted seven things that could be done with guns to save lives. I recommend the article to you and hope that you will take the time to read it. One fact that I did not realize. Twenty-two percent of adults in the United States own guns. Seventy-eight percent of adults don’t own guns.

Sat
31
Mar

Euthanizing geese not common sense solution

To the editor:

If you think about it, common sense is often not too common these days. This is very true in the people making decisions for us.

The thought that the answer to handling the goose problem in Shawano is to euthanize many of the geese. Park and Recreation Director Matt Hendricks and Shawano Mayor Jeanne Cronce are showing that they don’t understand what they are trying to push through.

First of all, the large amount of geese that were here used the Shawano waterways as a rest and feeding stop on their way back to Canada. They were not here to breed. This should have been obvious as there is no such thing as a Wisconsin goose. Common sense.

Sat
31
Mar

Screnock best choice for Supreme Court

To the editor:

With many of today’s societal ills being the direct result of decisions rendered by the courts, it is more important than ever to elect the right judges.

That is why I am asking my fellow citizens to support Michael Screnock for the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Judge Screnock is a committed constitutionalist, which means he will defend the rtle of law, as well as enforce the laws of our state as written. He is supported by the majority of our state law enforcement and county sheriffs.

His opponent, on the other hand, is a Milwaukee liberal with a record of going easy on hardened criminals, as well as being dedicated to legislating from the bench despite what our constitution has to say. Remember, all our constitution means, and this includes our national constitution, is what a certain number of people in black robes say what it means. Vote wisely, my friends.

John Krizan,
Shawano

Sat
31
Mar

State treasurer wants voters to cut his position

To the editor:

I am the current Wisconsin State Treasurer and, with your help, will hopefully be the last. I ask you to join me in voting yes on April 3 to permanently eliminate the state treasurer’s office.

I know it may seem odd to be advocating for the removal of the very position I hold, but the treasurer’s office has outlived its purpose and simply is no longer needed.

The office of the treasurer was established by the Wisconsin Constitution in 1848 and, while the position originally did hold a variety of duties, these were administrative in nature and have subsequently been transferred to other agencies to streamline government and increase efficiency.

Sat
31
Mar

Vote against eliminating state treasurer

To the editor:

Wisconsin voters will be answering a question when we vote on April 3. Two changes in our Wisconsin Constitution are incorporated into the one question. Do we want to eliminate the office of state treasurer? Do we want to replace the state treasurer (an elected position) with the lieutenant governor on the Board of Commissioners of Public Lands (BCPL)?

Among other duties, the treasurer has one constitutional duty. It requires the treasurer to serve as a member of the BCPL, which oversees investment income for public school libraries, making loans to municipalities and school districts, managing state trust lands for timber management and archiving land records.

The office of state treasurer is vital as a check on executive power and an independent fiscal watchdog. Replacing the treasurer with the lieutenant governor on the BCPL creates a disconcerting consolidation of power that has the potential to compromise transparent and fair government.

Sat
31
Mar

Young adults show passion on gun issue

To the editor:

Fri
30
Mar

Screnock’s positive attributes deserve consideration

To the editor:

As the Supreme Court race nears, it is good to be reminded about the many positive attributes of Judge Michael Screnock.

After having served in local government for over 12 years, he received further training when he worked at the law firm of Michael Best and Friedrich in its Madison office.

Civil litigation and administrative proceedings in a wide variety of subject areas continued to be Judge Screnock’s focus, as well as many complex cases, including defending Act 10. He has co-authored annual legal updates on administrative law topics for a Wisconsin State Bar publication.

As one of three Sauk County judges, he handles every type of case including, but not limited to, probate, juvenile cases, small claims disputes, divorce and family matters, traffic violations, civil commitments, as well as every type of criminal case.

Fri
30
Mar

Whealon knows how to work with people

To the editor:

I am endorsing Ed Whealon for mayor of the city of Shawano. I do not live in the city, so I am not able to vote for Ed, but I do live in the county. I want the city of Shawano to be successful because a thriving Shawano city affects the county in a positive way. A successful thriving city assures that county residents have employment opportunities, shopping and medical support close to home, just to name a few things.

Ed has run a business and understands the difficulty in starting and operating a business. As the chief of police, Ed worked with several agencies in and outside the city and county to build a modern weapons firing range that is in use to this day. That type of project takes planning, team/consensus building, leadership and vision.

Fri
30
Mar

Whealon supporter’s feathers ruffled over geese issue

One of the questions, at the mayoral debate, was a issue dealing with the city of Shawano’s transparency, i.e., meetings and such.

Candidate Ed Whealon answered the question by saying: “There was not enough transparency.”

Though there are many examples, he used the euthanizing of the geese at Smalley Park and Huckleberry Harbor at this debate. He discovered the $6,000 expense in the city budget for killing the geese while he was preparing for the debate. Let’s be clear; the city wanted to kill the geese.

Fri
30
Mar

Ambitious agenda passes with bipartisan support

Wisconsin is working.

Employment in our state is at an all-time high, and the unemployment rate of 2.9 percent is at a historic low. To continue to build our workforce, we invested more actual dollars into schools than ever before and included major increases for our technical college system. We balanced our budget and had another surplus yet still eliminated the state property tax. In fact, the cumulative impact of our tax relief through the end of the budget is $8 billion. We froze University of Wisconsin tuition for six years in a row to make college more affordable for students and working families. Our health care systems are ranked number one in the nation for quality.

To build on our successes, we laid out an ambitious agenda during our State of the State address in January. A special thanks to the members of the state Legislature who passed our ambitious agenda for 2018:

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