Opinions

Sat
19
Aug

Letter: Reflections on the Trump legacy

To the editor:

Donald, take a good look at your namesake. Fine-boned, slight, dimpled chin, a hint of bucked teeth, quick of step and quicker of speech. Hardly a lumbering, pugnacious, scowling, man of few words who is proudly readying a new litigation. I can bet that Jr. would rather be a father and at home.

It must be excruciating for you to watch this son who cannot, could not, will not pull off a scam like his old man. Is Mother watching this spectacle. Does she know that there was a better avenue for her precious firstborn? A better way for him to use his talents?

Now, Donald, will you be shamed? You, who are at the end of your life: Is there enough time left for you to change one little bit? Sad!

Mary Podzilni,

Wescott

Sat
12
Aug

Some old wives’ tales contain nuggets of truth

I’m sure most of you readers, at one time or another, had someone say, “That’s an old wives’ tale.” Some thought the tales were merely superstitions, while others considered them to contain some truths.

These tales are said to have been passed down by older women to the younger generation. The tales often discouraged bad behavior or encouraged ways to stay healthy.

Wives’ tales have been told for centuries. In fact, the King James Bible 1 Timothy 4:7 has Apostle Paul writing to Timothy, “But refuse profane and old wives’ fables and exercise thyself unto godliness.”

When I was a child, my dad told me to eat my carrots so I wouldn’t need glasses. “You never saw a rabbit wearing glasses, did you?” he would ask.

I broke a mirror once and was convinced seven years of bad luck would follow. Subsequently, when something bad happened, I was sure it was because of the broken mirror.

Sat
12
Aug

Easy to get home after going to wedding

Going to a wedding of someone you care about is usually a joyous and exciting endeavor. While I felt a little overwhelmed about the fact that the wedding was taking place in northern Minnesota, and I was driving alone, still I was excited.

I have traveled the highways and byways of northern Wisconsin quite often in the past, so I wasn’t fearful about finding my way. In fact, I was looking forward to seeing some sights that I hadn’t seen for years, such as the Dell’s Mill, near Augusta. This is an old grist mill from the past, before all of the modern machinery was made. I have stopped there many times, even once on a bus trip, where we toured the museum, and were given a tour of the mill, and how it worked. The mill itself is a beautiful red color, and there is a falls to the west of it, which powered the mill. It is one of the most photographed places in the state.

Sat
05
Aug

Temperance movement had its day in Shawano

I thought you might enjoy a little Shawano history.

The temperance movement, a social movement against the consumption and sale of alcoholic beverages, became widespread in 1874.

The movement also reached Shawano. In 1874 a local group supporting temperance was organized. A meeting was held at the Methodist Church. It was well-attended. Some of the local pastors gave stirring speeches, and temperance songs were sung. A pledge was signed by 58 attendees.

A second rally was held the following evening at the Presbyterian Hall, where more signatures were obtained.

Sat
05
Aug

Guest Opinion

The KMG Fireball (a.k.a. Afterburner) had a catastrophic breakdown at the opening day of the Ohio State Fair. The simple answer to “What happened?” is a sweep arm (or something in the junction between the seats and the sweep arm) broke.

In response, Fireballs (and Move-It/Spin Out, a related ride with the same gondola arrangement) worldwide have been shut down until KMG and accident investigators figure out exactly what happened.

Several fairs that have contracted carnival companies using the Freak Out (Fireball’s “little brother”) have decided not to allow the operation of Freak Outs, either.

For someone with a grade-school education and a conviction that all catastrophic failures can be prevented with enough qualified inspections, this seems to be a sensible precaution.

For anyone with the most basic understanding of the physics of mechanics and strength of materials, it’s like banning oranges because you discovered a worm in an apple.

Sat
29
Jul

Letter: Critical error in farm story

To the editor:

In seeing the story about our farm (July 28 edition), I want to point out a critical error.

The story and photo caption say that the calf barns were built without approval. That’s NOT true.

We had formal approval from Shawano County as part of our siting license in 2010. At that time, there was no requirement from the DNR for 100 percent collection of water, so there was no reason to submit anything to DNR.

All of our barns were built by 2015. It was not until March 2016 that the DNR began telling farmers they had to have runoff controls for calf barns. No one in the industry was using them before then.

This is an extremely important point. Our reputation is being damaged. We did nothing without approval. It’s absolutely unfair to claim otherwise.

The DNR should be made to respond to this.

Sat
29
Jul

Letter: Superintendent: Referendum investment in Bonduel community

To the editor:

The vote is here for the School District of Bonduel referendum. It’s been a long journey, and I want to say thank you to those parents and community members who have attended referendum and board meetings, called or emailed with questions, read through our mailings, and took the time to visit with me when I knocked on your door.

Our goal from day one has been to be transparent and candid through this process.

Sat
29
Jul

Travelers find Denmark unique, welcoming


Contributed Photo King Christian IV built Rosenborg Castle as a summer home in Copenhagen in 1606.

Five of my relatives — Elaine Knope, Lori Acken, Ellyn Ruhlmann, Elisabeth Kelly and Terry Malcheski — recently visited Denmark. Knowing I will never visit this small country where ancestors on my father’s side originated, I enjoyed the delightful stories about their visit and I hope you readers will too.

Elizabeth recalled the day the group landed in Denmark. She commented: “Finally, after all these months and years of Facebook posts and pictures, we met our cousin from Denmark! She is beautiful and elegant, but she also has a quirky eccentric look to her. Wild curly hair, ever so slightly cross-eyed at times and a silly sense of humor that despite the language/cultural differences, we all related to right away.”

Sat
22
Jul

Travelers find reminders of home in Denmark

While just teenagers, two young brothers came to the United States with a suitcase and a prayer. Walter Robenhagen (my grandfather) and Fred Robenhagen (Elaine Buettner Knope’s grandfather) set out on their own from their homeland Denmark to make a life here in America.

Elaine Knope, her daughter, Lori Acken (a well-known writer for TV Weekly Magazine/Channel Guide), nieces Elisabeth Roen Kelly and Ellyn Rowan Ruhlmann, and cousin Terry Malcheski recently returned from a trip to Denmark, a trip they will long remember.

Elaine commented: “It is such a small country, probably one-fourth the size of Wisconsin. I can understand why my grandpa immigrated to the U.S.A. in 1895 when he was only 18. He saw no future in Denmark because most of the land was already owned and he wanted to farm.”

Sat
15
Jul

Much going on in our little city

Today’s article is a little of this and a little of that. Shawano is a “happening” little city.

It’s great seeing all the young ballplayers and their moms, dads, grandparents and friends enjoying themselves at the youth league tournaments. It is so nice to observe the support these kids receive. What a wonderful way for young families to spend quality time together.

An additional positive is the impact these tournaments have on our local economy. Many of the out-of-town families stay at our local hotels. Visitors also frequent our restaurants, discover what fun it is to “shop Shawano,” purchase gas, and enjoy our beautiful parks, walking trails and other amenities.

A word of thanks to Ollie Burmeister for being a longtime local businessman. Ollie’s presence in the downtown will be missed. We wish him a long and enjoyable retirement.

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