Opinions

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: Constitution is dead, thanks to Obama and his supporters

To the editor:

The Constitution is now dead, thanks to all who put our current commander-in-chief in charge for the last 7½ years. Whether or not if you believe in the Bill of Rights, you lost what little is left Oct. 3, when federal agencies, at the behest of Barack Obama and without consent of Congress, gave control of the internet to an international group. ICANN, based in California, had been the guardian of the internet making sure it was free to all to use as well as free to access for free speech without charge to anyone.

Now we cannot be assured of access, freedom from censorship or freedom from being charged to use the net. If you are a Christian, conservative or a lover of the Constitution you already know your being called a bigot, racist, homophobe, Islamaphobe and a terrorist by the mainstream media as well as many in the federal government.

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: Feingold knows how to get things done

To the editor:

A teacher friend told my sister, a retired teacher, that Russ Feingold was the smartest student she ever had. I have known Russ since he first ran for office to represent the Middleton area in the Wisconsin Legislature.

His experience in government is valuable in actually accomplishing things in Washington. The bipartisan campaign finance reform act he cosponsored with Republican John McCain is just one example.

After serving in elected office, I learned how different government is from business. Feingold knows how to protect our constitutional rights and still keep the country safe. He has presented an actual plan for saving Social Security.

Feingold deserves our thanks for devoting his talents to public service. He also deserves your vote to return him to the U.S. Senate.

Mary-Beth Kuester,

Clintonville

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: There’s no reason we can’t end TB

To the editor:

What many think of as a disease from the days of “La Boheme,” tuberculosis is today the world’s leading infectious killer.

According to new data from the World Health Organization, the age-old scourge is even worse than we knew, with more people falling sick, more people dying and more cases of dangerous drug-resistant strains than we previously thought.

How is this possible when TB is both preventable and curable? TB will only end when the world summons the energy and commitment to end it. But the White House has tried to cut TB funding for the last five years.

We have to demand that our next president and Congress reverse course, making the end of TB a priority in our policies and in our investments. This is a problem we can solve, and it’s time to take action before the TB epidemic becomes even worse and more widespread.

David Koeller,

Shawano

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: Look at Wisconsin for example of rigged elections

To the editor:

You want to talk about rigged elections? Look no further than Wisconsin. Five years ago, Republicans in Madison spent 2 million taxpayer dollars in secret meetings to approve new legislative district boundaries.

These elected officials were not involved in deciding on the new boundaries; they were simply given the new maps — after they signed an oath not to discuss the maps with the pubic that had elected them.

The new district boundaries had immediate results in the 2012 election. There were 1.4 million Democratic votes cast that year and 1.2 million Republican votes. Yet Republicans won 60 of the 99 Assembly seats while the Democrats won only 39. That means Democrats cast 54 percent of the votes but won only 40 percent of the elections. Gerrymandering at its best and worst.

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: Trump policies would hurt poor, middle class

To the editor:

Donald Trump supporters don’t seem to care about his specific policy proposals. They simply trust that Trump is on their side. They believe his lies, including his vow to protect the government programs they like, including Medicare and Social Security.

Trump’s policies would undermine programs for the middle class and poor. Trump’s agenda would, by any reasonable reckoning, create huge new deficits. In its latest incarnation, it would add more than $5 trillion to the national debt over the next decade. Trump is proposing permanent changes to the government’s revenue stream that, if enacted, would drain the federal treasury of money it needs to finance these programs.

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: Clinton has the temperament to lead US

To the editor:

As the campaign season nears an end, let us consider our presidential nominees.

We have a choice between someone who has had many years of beneficial public service, Hillary Clinton, versus Donald Trump, a businessman and reality show star.

We have watched the debates (hopefully) and educated ourselves of the nominees’ differences and likenesses. This is not a gender differentiation. Their differences vary in the way they have addressed the constituents, all of us, whom they propose to lead.

Not only has Donald Trump demeaned women, all women, by calling them pigs, dogs and other things, but he has also demeaned many citizens. He has called those of Mexican heritage rapists. He has demeaned Muslims, the disabled. He called Sen. Elizabeth Warren, one of the country’s most esteemed senators, Pocahontas, attempting to demean Native American heritage. He has even demeaned John McCain because he was captured.

Fri
28
Oct

Letter: Gallagher best suited to represent 8th District

To the editor:

I support Mike Gallagher, who is running for Congress in the 8th District of Wisconsin, because he has both the education and experience that prepares him for that position during these dangerous times.

Michael Gallagher began his college education in 2002 at Princeton University and received his degree in international affairs/near Eastern studies in 2006. He holds a Master of Science degree in strategic intelligence from the National Intelligence University in Washington. He then went to Georgetown University as a graduate student focusing on security studies and government, earning his master’s in both fields in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In 2015 he attained a PhD in government/international relations from Georgetown University.

Sat
22
Oct

Welcome kids big and small on Halloween

Halloween decorations can be seen in front yards, porches and store windows. Halloween is one of the world’s oldest holidays, dating back 2,000 years to pagan times. It is one of the most popular celebrated holidays, second only to Christmas.

Children enjoy putting on costumes for school parties and trick-or-treating. Families love going to a pumpkin patch to select a perfect pumpkin to make a jack-o-lantern.

Halloween culture can be traced back to the Druids, a Celtic culture in Ireland, Britain and Northern Europe. It had its origins in the ancient Celtic festival known as Samhain. Halloween is celebrated on Oct. 31, the last day of the Celtic calendar. It was originally a pagan holiday to honor the dead.

The current name of Halloween originates from the All Hallows Evening, which was shortened to All Hallow’s Eve. Halloween is followed by All Saints Day, created by Christians to convert pagans. It is celebrated on Nov. 1.

Sat
22
Oct

Family visit brings back warm memories

A visit to southern Wisconsin with my Aunt Gertie always leads to reminiscing, hugs and love. I recently made a trip there to visit her. When I called and asked if the day I planned to spend there would work for her schedule, she gave me phone numbers of some of my cousins that she wanted to see, too.

She may be 102 years old, but she is still as active as her body allows, and loves to visit with people. Sure, she is somewhat forgetful, but then who isn’t, and we aren’t her age. So, I called the cousins, and there was a crew at her apartment, visiting with each other and her.

We went out to lunch, and then came back and visited some more. She got out her 3D pictures and viewer again, and told us to take the pictures of our families home with us.

Sat
15
Oct

Domestic violence hurts people in every community

October is Domestic Violence Awareness month. Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery or sexual assault of another person. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, psychological violence and emotional abuse.

Domestic violence is an attempt to gain power and control over another person. It affects people in every community. Domestic abuse knows no boundaries. It occurs in families with diverse educational, racial or economic status. It affects people of all ages, gender, religion or sexual orientation.

It can start with name calling, threats, possessiveness or distrust. Abusers often apologize for their actions or they try to convince the person they are abusing that they do these things out of love or care. The violence and control intensifies over time.

Here are a few of the things abusers attempt to do to control their victim:

• They control the money (paychecks, check book, savings).

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