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Opinions

Wed
10
Apr

Americans need action, not acting, in Trump’s Cabinet

Perhaps when Donald Trump leaves the White House, whether it’s in two years or six, he should fund a theater troupe.

Democrats might assume I’m making light of his overdramatic personality, but in this case, I’m talking about all of the “acting” Cabinet members and other key agency directors. With the recent resignation of Kirstjen Neilsen, the Secretary for Homeland Security, we now have more than a dozen Trump officials in acting position, with Kevin McAleenan being the latest one offered a chance at the spotlight.

Trump seems to like having acting directors instead of permanent people who can execute a vision of the future for his administration. He told CBS’ “Face the Nation” that “I like ‘acting’ because I can move so quickly. It gives me more flexibility.”

Wed
10
Apr

Keep the government out of higher education

Without college, we will not succeed. Does college guarantee success, or is success up to you? The Declaration of Independence clearly states, “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness,” no guarantee.

We have all seen the headlines exposing the scam by wealthy people to get their children into big-name colleges, Operation Varsity Blues. It appears these helicopter parents faked their children’s athletic ability and hired coaches to assist and correct admission exams and bribery. This parental effort was not about the child’s education, but rather it was all about attending a prestigious college and networking with other elite young adults.

Wed
10
Apr

It’s more important than ever to protect the earth

“Earth Day. Let’s never call it a day.”

This was the slogan on the 25th anniversary of Earth Day on April 22, 1995. International alliances brought 184 countries around the world to observe Earth Day in 2000.

Gaylord Nelson was a leading figure in the fight against environmental degradation in the 20th century. In Wisconsin he became known at the “conservation governor.” In 1962, he took his fight for conservation to the U.S. Senate. Through his efforts, the first Earth Day was held on April 22, 1970. It started out as a teach-in for schools across the country and continues to inspire individuals to do something to preserve our environment ever since.

Wed
10
Apr

LETTER: Elections are over; time to get involved

To the editor:

Now that the spring elections are over it is the responsibility of the citizens of these municipalities to attend the meetings and voice their concerns on issues such as road projects and taxes. If you don’t get involved, you may end up with poor decisions being made that waste valuable taxpayer money and produce unfavorable results.

One example would be those decisions made by one local township to install a culvert too shallow and in the wrong place in an area known to have frost problems. The result? A permanent speed bump that will persist unless it is rectified. Not removing large rocks and other debris from the roadbed prior to repaving will doom the new pavement to failure prematurely.

Thu
04
Apr

Latest twists on Smollett case ring with injustice

I was livid when it was revealed that the supposed hate crime against “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett turned out to be a hoax. When charges were filed against Smollett in Chicago, I thought it was essential to send a message to celebrities everywhere that your golden pulpit comes with consequences when you misuse it.

According to the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office, there aren’t consequences, at least not the same that you or I would be if we cried wolf. The office decided it wasn’t worth the time — after already spending $130,000 pursuing the case — and decided to drop all charges against Smollett after he spent two days performing community service and forfeited his $10,000 bond. “Alternative prosecution,” they called it.

I call it a celebrity getting off easy.

Thu
04
Apr

Baby genocide, not climate change, is ‘our World War II’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez made headlines when saying that the imperative of addressing climate change is “our World War II,” adding that the world is in big trouble within 12 years if we don’t. Her analogy to World War II really struck me.

In addition to history books, much of what I’ve learned about World War II comes directly from veterans and the stories I’ve overheard them retelling. When I was a teenager, I worked at a fast-food restaurant. One of my favorite memories was listening to the group of World War II veterans retell war stories as they enjoyed their coffee together Monday through Friday, 6:30-9 a.m., like clockwork.

I never asked them why they fought in the war, or what they thought they were fighting for. I didn’t need to. Their stories made it clear. At least from my interpretation, fighting for freedom and liberation, fighting for their countrymen and fighting to prevent genocide, were some of the main reasons why these men risked their lives.

Fri
29
Mar

Dark truths hate to be brought to light

Well, thank heavens that got clarified.

After being found guilty of 62 counts of child porn possession, sex assault and child enticement, former teacher Tim Schmidt made it clear that his abuse of power and predation on children was thrown way out of proportion by the news media.

The Shawano Leader’s reporting of Schmidt’s assault, on both the actual student and the children whose photos he downloaded on the internet, was slanderous and defaming, he said.

Defaming? Because we didn’t present a “fair and balanced” response? Should we have sought out someone who argued that, really, sexual predation on children is not so bad?

Slanderous? Because he wasn’t charged with a crime, wasn’t convicted — oh, wait. Both of those are true.

Fri
29
Mar

Time to decide what ‘reality’ we want for America’s Dairyland

“Reality.” It’s a word I’ve run across lately more than I’d like.

The reality is, or so I’ve been told, that little can be done to save the hundreds of dairy farmers who are going out of business and being wiped from the landscape of America’s Dairyland. The reality is that farms that have been in families for generations are being sold off, piece by piece. Farms that once supported a family can no longer pay the bills on milk prices that have been in the trough for nearly five years. Meanwhile, farm debt and bankruptcies, farmer suicides, and rural mental health issues are all on the rise, and our Main Streets are dying.

In 2018, Wisconsin lost nearly 700 dairy herds, according to the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. USDA statistics show that across America, 2,731 (or 6.5 percent) of licensed dairy farms were lost from 2017 to 2018.

Fri
29
Mar

Hagedorn will protect people’s liberties

To the editor:

Fellow Wisconsinites, our liberties, guns, and freedoms we enjoy in Wisconsin are slowly being stolen from us. There are many judges who write their own laws instead of following the Constitution. We have judges ruling the Second Amendment, the right to bear arms, should be thrown out. We have judges ruling the unborn do not have a right to life. We have judges ruling religious liberties are not relevant anymore.

We, the Wisconsinites, have let judges make laws instead of delivering what the Constitution declares what is law. Our Constitution lays out the law of the land, and this is final. A judge that wants to make law should be running for a seat in the legislative branch, not the judicial branch!

Sat
23
Mar

What’s in a name when it comes to stone-cold killers?

New Zealand became the latest country to experience an act of terrorism when an Australian man walked into two different mosques in Christchurch and killed almost 50 people. That incident, like many in the United States, prompted a call for banning the type of gun used by said terrorist.

It also prompted another interesting reaction from the New Zealand prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, who made a plea this week to Parliament that the man responsible for the attacks would not be referred to by name. To give him a name would give him an undeserved notoriety, according to Ardern.

“He may have sought notoriety, but we in New Zealand will give him nothing. Not even his name,” Ardern said in a National Public Radio story.

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