Opinions

Fri
15
Aug

Letter: S.O.S. K-9 fills void for county

To the editor:

Community policing is a philosophy that promotes organizational strategies, which support the systematic use of partnerships and problem-solving techniques, to proactively address the immediate conditions that give rise to public safety issues such as crime, social disorder and fear of crime.

Community policing, recognizing that police rarely can solve public safety problems alone, encourages interactive partnerships with relevant stakeholders. The range of potential partners is large, and these partnerships can be used to accomplish the two interrelated goals of developing solutions to problems through collaborative problem solving and improving public trust.

Since being sheriff, I have stressed to my officers that community policing is an important part of what we do. With 1,000 square miles, 25 townships and 30-plus small communities in the county, you may not see this working, but it’s taking place on a daily basis in some way.

Fri
15
Aug

Letter: Isn't sheriff's job to serve and protect?

To the editor:

In last Saturday’s paper, there was an article about Bieber’s run for sheriff. In that article Bieber said three things I would like to respond to:

1. “He will bring a change of attitude to the department.”

2. “We’re not there to save peoples lives. … We’re going to try, but that’s not going to happen. … Statistically, 99 percent of the time we’re going to be there to pick up your dead body, unfortunately.”

3: “Bieber said the public has to take steps to protect itself.” … “With freedom comes responsibility. … We’ll be there to help, but it’s your responsibility for that. … Part of that mindset is the public is responsible for its own safety.”

Talk about a real shot in the arm for the tourism industry in Shawano County! If Mr. Bieber’s job is not to save lives, then why on earth is he wearing a badge? I have always thought the motto of law enforcement is to serve and protect. Has this now become an outdated idea?

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: Breastfeeding better for mom, baby

To the editor:

I make milk – what’s your superpower? From Aug. 1-7, families everywhere celebrated World Breastfeeding Week.

Breastfeeding is normal, healthy and efficient. Feeding a baby for the first year on formula can cost over $1,200; nursing is free.

Breast milk has disease-fighting cells called antibodies that help protect infants from germs, illness and even sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Breastfeeding is linked to a lower risk of various health problems for babies, including ear infections, stomach viruses, respiratory infections, asthma, obesity, type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and childhood leukemia. For moms, breastfeeding is linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, ovarian cancer and postpartum depression.

Infant formula cannot match the exact chemical makeup of human milk, especially the cells, hormones and antibodies that fight disease. For most babies, breast milk is easier to digest than formula.

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: Wright is right person for the job

To the editor:

As the primary election is getting close, I want to encourage Shawano County voters to re-elect Sheriff Randy Wright. I have known Randy since my late father-in-law, Jim Knope, was sheriff, and I know that Randy is an honest, hardworking law enforcement official.

Randy has run a clean campaign by telling voters what he has accomplished, what he hopes to accomplish in the next four years, and by standing up to his opponents for what he feels is in the best interest of his employees and the citizens of Shawano County.

The list of supportive law enforcement officials, former employees and former co-workers shows how much respect others feel toward Sheriff Wright. Randy knows the job of sheriff and the years that he has served as sheriff prove that he is the person for the job.

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: Learn about Bonduel budget at coffee chats

To the editor:

The Bonduel School District will be holding “coffee chats” at locations around the district. Topics of discussion will include the proposed increase in the local tax levy, annual budget, state funding, updates for the upcoming school year and highlights of the 2013-14 year.

Property owners, parents and concerned citizens, I urge you to stop in at one of the three chats to find out what is happening in our school district. At the chat you will be able to ask questions.

Patrick Rau, our new Bonduel School District superintendent, will be hosting these chats at 8 a.m. Aug. 12 at The Hungry Bear, 6 p.m. Aug. 13 at Navarino Fire Department and at 11 a.m. Aug. 14 at the Cecil Diner. These meetings are being held prior to the annual district meeting at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 18 in the high school commons area.

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: Time for change at Sheriff's Department

To the editor:

In a story in The Shawano Leader on July 26, Randy Wright engages in County Board bashing, stating a handful of members make up a “faction” to “block borrowing.”

I serve as a member of the Shawano County Board and hope I am being included in that conservative group. Wise use and the protection of the taxpayer’s dollar is our job. We must spend on needs, not just wants.

Wright also blames the board for things being “stalled” and implies there is a need to “get things moving.”

Wright seems to be under the misguided perception that he is running against the County Board in the Aug. 12 election. No County Board members are on that ballot.

The next sheriff will have to work with the County Board, like it or not. We are supposed to all be on the same team, working for the people of Shawano County.

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: Kuester opposes Rose recall effort

To the editor:

A citizen is circulating papers to recall Alderperson Greg Rose. Just 56 signatures will require the city to hold a special election. These signers do not have to be registered voters and do not have to have voted in the last election.

The cost of this special election is estimated at a little over $2,500, not including the time city staff will have to spend preparing and implementing the election. If a primary was necessary there would be the additional cost of another election.

Rose was elected in 2013 to a two-year term. By the time an election could actually be held, if the effort succeeds, Rose will have served much of his term. So just 56 people will be able to force a redo of the election held in 2013. When Rose was elected he had 84 votes, and his opponent had 77.

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: We need to cut costs, not spend more

To the editor:

Only government bureaucrats who have made a career of spending other people’s money could be so ignorant as to how to run an efficient operation and minimize cost to shareholders, aka: taxpayers.

The proposal to maximize tax levies simply because “we can” is unconscionable. Local unemployment is still over 6 percent, housing values have not returned to pre-recession values, and the average taxpayer income of $29,000 is far less than the average local government school employee income of $42,000.

Let’s not forget that 75 percent to 80 percent of all local taxes go to pay salaries and benefits of government employees. The tired government bureaucrat justification of “it’s for the children” is only about 20 percent accurate.

Sat
09
Aug

Letter: Client appreciates pantry, workers

To the editor:

I recently received this letter and wanted to share it:

“For months my family struggled until I could put it off no longer, so I called the food pantry. The call was to inquire about income limits, hours, etc. Flo answered. Not only did she answer my questions, but she also encouraged me to come if needed.

“One day I put on my girl girl panties, which come from being a mom, and, shaking like a leaf, headed to the pantry, knowing this had to be done. Who would see me? What would people think of me?

“From that first phone call to the moment I walked in the door, and every time since, I have been treated with dignity and respect. Heck, there’s even been a dance (polka) in the aisle I’ve watched bring a smile to another person picking up food and myself peaking up to watch.

Fri
01
Aug

Letter: Sheriff, not board, blocked evidence storage solutions

To the editor:

Sheriff Randy Wright’s comments in the July 31 Leader article contain incorrect statements about the evidence storage building. Let’s look at facts.

The Shawano County Board approved a secured evidence storage building in the Capital Improvement Plan, a 50- by 100-foot building, for a cost of $306,545, to be constructed in 2009. The board funded the project on Jan. 29, 2009. Resolution 6-09 borrowed $2.5 million on a temporary borrowing, including more than $370,000 for the evidence storage building and $750,000 for Maple Lane.

Wright stalled the project, not the County Board.

The storage facility did not get built or even started because it wasn’t good enough for the sheriff. We paid (wasted) bankers’ fees and interest on this money for a year and a half while the sheriff complained that it had to have fancy offices, a lab, conference room, heated storage for junk cars, talk of a kitchen and, at one point, a medical examiners office.

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